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800 Kashmiri youths appear for Army exam amid unrest

first_img “It is a clear rejection of regressive bandh calls, for choosing a brighter future,” the official said.Authorities in Kashmir on Sunday imposed curfew-like restrictions in many parts of the Valley to maintain law and order in view of the protests following the killing of Bhat in an encounter with security forces. Nearly 800 Kashmiri youths on Sunday appeared in the common entrance exam for selection of junior commissioned officers and other ranks in the Army amid unrest in the Valley following the killing of Hizbul Mujahideen militant Sabzar Bhat, successor of Burhan Wani.“Defying bandh call from various inimical factions, 799 candidates appeared in the common entrance examination held at Pattan and Srinagar on Sunday,” an army official said.He said 16 of the 815 candidates, who had passed the physical and medicals tests held earlier, did not turn up for the written exam.Written Examination #IndianArmy JCOs & OR held at Srinagar & Pattan. 799 in Pattan & 493 in Srinagar appear today pic.twitter.com/f9af1ZOMrG— ADG PI – INDIAN ARMY (@adgpi) May 28, 2017last_img read more

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Bhima-Koregaon violence: prime accused Milind Ekbote sent to police custody

first_imgThe Pune District and Sessions court on Thursday remanded Milind Ekbote, prime accused in inciting the Bhima-Koregaon riots on New Year’s Day, to police custody till 19 March.Mr. Ekbote was arrested by a team of the Pune Rural Police after the Supreme Court on Wednesday had cancelled his interim bail relief.The police had requested the court for a 14-day custody in order to carry out a comprehensive interrogation of the accused, said sources.The probe agencies are trying to retrieve Mr. Ekbote’s mobile phone to examine his call records and determine the printing source of thousands of inflammatory pamphlets which were allegedly distributed a few days before the riots of January 1.“We had petitioned the court that Mr. Ekbote be given minimum remand as he had no direct involvement in the riots,” said S.K. Jain, Mr. Ekbote’s counsel.Mr. Ekbote, who has been booked under a various sections pertaining to rioting under the Indian Penal Code and the Prevention of Atrocities Act, was picked up from his home in the city’s Shivajinagar area on Wednesday.Two FIRs were lodged against Mr. Ekbote — who is executive president of the outfit Samasta Hindu Aghadi — and 85-year-old leader Sambhaji Bhide ‘Guruji’ for allegedly orchestrating the Koregaon Bhima riots which left one person dead during the celebrations to commemorate the bicentenary of the Bhima-Koregaon battle.The opposition Congress have accused the State government of going ‘soft’ on Mr. Bhide, who is based in Sangli, while the pro-Maratha Sambhaji Brigade have demanded that a narco-analysis test be conducted on Mr. Ekbote to determine the full extent of his involvement in orchestrating the riots.The apex court quashed further extensions of Mr. Ekbote’s bail relief after the State prosecutor submitted that he was not cooperating with the probe agencies.Earlier, Mr. Ekbote’s anticipatory bail application was rejected by the Pune Sessions court on January 22 and again by the Bombay High Court on February 2.last_img read more

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FIR against Rajasthan Minister for his remarks

first_imgPolice have registered a case against Rajasthan Minister of State for Rural Development Dhan Singh Rawat for seeking votes in the name of religion. “All Hindus should unite to vote for the BJP,” Mr. Rawat had said at an election rally in Banswara district.The FIR has been registered under Section 125 (promoting enmity between classes in connection with election) of the Representation of the People Act, 1951, on the complaint of Tehsildar Ram Singh lodged on behalf of the Returning Officer and District Magistrate of Banswara. The State Chief Electoral Officer earlier gave approval for lodging the case.At a public meeting in Banswara on Saturday, Mr. Rawat purportedly said: “If Muslims can vote en masse for Congress, then all Hindus should also unite and go with the BJP and make it win with a thumping majority.”Mr. Rawat, representing the reserved constituency of Banswara in the State Assembly, also said that the Congress was a “party of Muslims” and the BJP was a protector of India’s ‘Sanatan Sanskriti’ (eternal culture).Chief Electoral Officer Anand Kumar said Mr. Rawat’s remarks were prima facie found to be in violation of the model code of conduct in force for the upcoming Assembly election. The Returning Officer had earlier issued a notice to the Minister and sought his reply in three days. The case has been referred to CID-CB for investigation.While the ruling BJP has tried to play down the controversy, Pradesh Congress vice-president Archana Sharma said this was clearly an attempt to polarise the voters on religious lines. “The BJP leaders have been making such remarks with impunity to get political benefit without paying heed to the damage caused to the social structure,” she said.last_img read more

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Healthway Hospital opens in Goa

first_imgHealthway Hospital, Goa’s first hospital owned and operated entirely by the State’s prominent medical professionals, was inaugurated here on Sunday. Dr. Virendra Gaonkar, Chairman, Healthway Hospitals Pvt Ltd, Dr. Antonio De Bossuet Afonso,Chairman, Goa Doctors Alliance Pvt Ltd., have called it a major initiative in the field of healthcare, pioneered by a team of specialists and super specialist doctors, who have pooled together their collective talents and resources to create this facility. Healthway Hospital is a multi-speciality facility, offering speciality and super-speciality medical care, along with other health-related services all under one roof, with a vision of providing affordable healthcare to patients in Goa, said Dr. Gaonkar. The 250-bed super-speciality hospital is located at the Kadamba plateau, in close proximity to the State capital with easy accessibility to all major transport hubs. It is also the only health facility in Goa which is a centre for advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training for medical professionals.last_img read more

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A conclave on the significance of failure

first_imgThe key qualification to be a speaker at a unique conclave recently held in Dehradun was that you ought to have failed at least once in your life. Featuring the motto, “Failures open the door to success”, the ‘Failures Conclave’ was aimed at helping school and college-going students come face-to-face with individuals, including three Padma Shri awardees, who had encountered and overcome failures in their careers.“Failure is not the end,” said Avdhash Kaushal, an academic and Padma Shri winner who heads the Rural Litigation and Entitlement Kendra, which had organised the conclave. Instead, it “should be used as a motivation to achieve your goals,” said Mr. Kaushal, who had failed while at school.Recipe for success Addressing an audience of school and college-going students from Bhutan, Punjab and local schools, Padma Shri awardee and ayurvedic physician Vaidya Balendu Prakash stressed that hard work, discipline, dedication, the right friends and an eye on the goal were all that one needed to succeed. “Failure keeps you in check when you stray from this path,” said Mr. Prakash, sharing that he had struggled through school and college. “Nobody is programmed to fail but this fall can be the blueprint for success given the right opportunity and goal,” he added.Yogesh Chandra, a retired physics professor, revealed that physics was a subject that he had failed in as a student. “Those who fail in conventional academic work are mostly those who do not adhere to the norm and have taken a path that nobody dared before,” said Dr. Chandra. “From them come inventors and people who see things differently. Toppers take discoveries and inventions made by these people forward,” he added.Mr. Kaushal said the prime motivation for the conference was the high suicide rate among schoolchildren, who are often overwhelmed by the fear of academic failure. “With this as the background, we Padma Shri awardees have got together for this conclave to give a peek into our failures and how we turned it around for ourselves and proved to be valuable resource to society,” added Mr. Kaushal.Renowned writer and Padma Shri winner Leeladhar Jagudi maintained that good company was vital.“Make good friends to be successful in life. Bad company can ruin good people,” he said.“Failure is not the end of life,” said Dhan Singh Rawat, Uttarakhand’s Minister of Higher Education. “Learning from our failures and not giving up is the secret to success.”last_img read more

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Harassment pushes Dalit family to the brink

first_imgAlleged constant humiliation by some upper caste people forced a Dalit family in Paltupuri village under Hastinapur police station to attempt ending their lives, leading to the death of one, while two are battling for life at a private hospital in Meerut.The police said they were not approached but the victims’ relatives alleged that the family had lost faith in the local police after their previous complaint bore no fruit. This time, the daughter had dialled the 1090 number of the U.P. Police but did not get any help. Humiliated and threatened, Satyapal Singh* consumed poison with his wife, Shivrani, 50, and daughter Rita. Shivrani died, while Satyapal and Rita are in a “critical condition”.“They are not on ventilator support but their blood pressure continues to be low,” said Dr. Rahul Kathuriya of Sushila Jaswantrai Hospital in Meerut.When The Hindu visited Paltupuri, around 40 km from Meerut, on Friday, Sher Singh, elder brother of Satyapal, said that on April 15, Shivrani was walking down a lane when she was hit by the bike of one of the boys of the Kashyap family, part of the dominant group in the village. The Kashyaps are dhimars who come under the OBC category. “She retaliated, which led to an attack by the Kashyaps. They abused her with casteist slurs and tried to molest her. When my brother intervened, he was beaten up. The attackers threatened to kill his son Rohan.” Sher Singh alleged that his brother’s family was facing repeated harassment at the hands of the Kashyaps because Satyapal was a graduate in agriculture and his children were “doing well academically” — Rita, 22, studies B.Sc. at Delhi University and Rohan, 20, is a BCA student. The brother-sister duo were also taunted and harassed, said Sher Singh. “The latest was when Rita visited the village to cast her vote. Being of modest physique, Rohan could not take them on.” Rohan told The Hindu that in 2016 there was an attempt to molest his sister. “She was being stalked by Ravi [the main accused] for the last four years. When we complained, the accused’s family colluded with the police and faked injuries. They made a case against us. We were left with no choice but to compromise at the behest of the local Nagar Palika chairman.”No help from kin In the latest case, Rohan said, his father approached a court in Meerut directly under Section 156/3 of CrPC on April 16. “When he told his brothers and other family members about his decision, they refused to stand by him. He was left with no choice. We are educated, we could not stoop to their level. My father called my sister home from Delhi. On April 17, they consumed poison when I went out to take an exam in Mawana.”Sher Singh admitted that they had developed cold feet. “We told Satyapal that he could shift out of the village as his children were well-educated but we had to live with them [Kashyaps]. He went into a shell after that.”The police have registered an FIR against eight accused under Sections 147, 323, 452, 354, 352, 306 of the IPC and Section 3(2)5 of SC/ST Act. Five accused held“Five of the eight accused, including Ravi, have been nabbed. The rest would be arrested soon,” said Avinash Pandey, SP (Rural), Meerut. “I don’t know about the past, but had the local police been approached this time we would have taken action,” he said.Mr. Pandey said the District Magistrate has initiated action against the village chowkidar. “I have sought a report from Circle Officer, Mawana, about the previous complaints. 100 number was not dialled. The daughter dialled the Women Power Line 1090, where the process is graded. First, a warning is sent to the accused. We will spread awareness that in serious cases, people should call 100 or CUG (Closed User Group) numbers of police officers. The girl has recorded her statement with the SDM. We are providing security to the family,” he said.The male members of the accused’s family have left the village and the female members are avoiding the media. (*All names have been changed in the copy.)Suicide prevention helpline: Sanjivini, Society for Mental Health, 011-4076 9002, Monday-Saturday (10 a.m.-7.30 p.m.)last_img read more

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From village sabhas to cricket match, Jyotiraditya Scindia pitches for Guna again

first_imgIf he wins by a margin of 3 lakh votes, then the people of Guna would have hit a six, says former cricketer-turned-politician Navjot Singh Sidhu, talking about the incumbent MP, Jyotiraditya Scindia, on Thursday evening.The two Congress leaders had just wrapped up a for-show cricket match in Guna Lok Sabha constituency’s Shivpuri as a part of Mr. Scindia’s campaign, when they returned to the field of the Madhavrao Scindia Cricket Stadium for the political part of the evening.Seeking re-election to a seat that was held by his father, Madhavrao Scindia, and before that his grandmother, Vijaya Raje Scindia, and that he has represented since his father’s death in 2002, Mr. Scindia spent the day holding sabhas in villages, ending with the cricket match in Shivpuri.As the scion of the erstwhile Scindia royal family scored a boundary, the crowd celebrated with “Maharaj zindabad”, while a fan of Mr. Sidhu shouted “Come on, Sidhu paaji”.After wrapping up the ‘match’, Mr. Sidhu told the crowd: “Take it from me in writing, after Rahul Gandhi, the Minister at the second spot will be Mr. Scindia.”He said Mr. Scindia had won by 1.20 lakh votes in 2014 and if he won by the same margin, it would be like scoring two runs.”Two lakhs would be hitting a four and if he wins by 3 lakh, then you would have scored a six,” he said.The possible margin comes up often in conversations with Congress workers as well as residents. Having won the 2002 bypoll by over 4 lakh votes, Mr. Scindia’s victory margin went down to 1.2 lakh in 2014.Ankit Singh, a businessman from Shivpuri and self-professed BJP supporter who attended the cricket event, said: “This seat is reserved, for the Scindias. But I voted for the Congress in the Assembly elections, because that was about the Chief Minister. This election is about the Prime Minister and there is no one else but [Narendra] Modi.”Earlier in the day, at one of his sabhas, the candidate spoke to residents of Naguli village about the work he had done for the area in the past 17 years, from the construction of roads to the setting up of a footwear design institute.Aide-turned-opponent This time, Mr. Scindia is facing his own former aide, K.P. Yadav, who joined the BJP ahead of the Assembly polls, a contest that locals say is not a real one.“He is a dummy candidate,” said a Congress worker in Shivpuri.last_img read more

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Shutdown static blinds U.S. radio telescopes

first_imgU.S. radio telescopes are going off the air as a result of the government shutdown. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is turning off its three U.S.-based facilities today because of a lack of funds, although it will be able to continue supporting a fourth international telescope based in Chile for a short while longer.“We’re really at a dead halt,” NRAO Director Anthony Beasley tells ScienceInsider from the group’s headquarters in Charlottesville, Virginia. Some 385 NRAO staff members are being sent home, with about 90 remaining to look after sensitive equipment. Overall, it costs about $150,000 per day to keep the observatories running, Beasley estimates.NRAO, largely funded by the National Science Foundation, is a coalition of universities that operates four facilities that collect electromagnetic signals from space:The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the world’s most sensitive single-dish radio telescope;The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), a 27-telescope array in New Mexico heavily used by astronomers;The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a 10-telescope array spread across more than 8600 kilometers from Hawaii to the Virgin Islands that is used for high-resolution astronomy; andThe Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an observatory in Chile run in partnership with Europe, Japan, and Chile.Several thousand researchers use data from the telescopes to explore a wide range of questions, including how stars and galaxies behave and how the universe formed. A few hundred astronomers are especially heavy users, Beasley says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Now, the GBT, VLA, and VLBA are all going offline, Beasley says. NRAO’s ALMA operations will continue “for another 3 or 4 weeks,” he says. “We have some additional resources in the bank in Chile.”Although the shutdown began on 1 October, NRAO was able to stay open until today because it had some funding left over from the 2013 fiscal year, which ended on 30 September. “We were able to cruise out for a couple of days from the shutdown, but we couldn’t keep going,” Beasley says.Shutting down the telescopes “isn’t as easy as flicking a switch,” he says. And the skeleton crew will be responsible for maintaining some sensitive parts, including cryogenically cooled electronics. If the shutdown goes into November, however, the telescopes could be in trouble. “This is a very difficult situation,” Beasley says, especially if it gets to the point where NRAO can’t pay its electric bills.You can see our complete shutdown coverage here.last_img read more

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Forget Smart Watches, ‘Smart Skin’ May Be the Next Big Thing in Wearable Computers

first_imgParkinson’s patients could one day ditch their pills for a stretchy skin patch with a mind of its own. Using specialized sensors, the patch would monitor the wearer’s vital signs, beam the information to a doctor, and administer medication as needed. While such devices still face substantial obstacles before wide-scale implementation, two teams of researchers have announced innovations combining standard electronics with flexible materials that may bring the futuristic concept closer to reality.Conventional electronics, such as those found in computers and smartphones, are built on stiff slabs of silicon. While durable, the design makes for bulky and uncomfortable wearable devices. Flexible electronics instead print circuits onto limber strips of silicone or plastic. The bendable base layers make devices twist and stretch when attached to the skin, but they are limited by a lack of key components such as batteries and processors that currently do not exist in flexible form.Researchers from Seoul National University led by bioengineer Dae-Hyeong Kim have now developed a patch that automatically delivers medication to Parkinson’s patients. Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder that causes movement impairments such as hand tremors that require regular medication to suppress. Typically, patients take pills every few hours, leading to a spike in medication levels followed by a gradual decline that causes the tremors to return. The team’s skin patch instead supplies a series of smaller measured doses as needed by using a tremor-detecting sensor. Because the device needs to track the tremors over time, they utilized a newly invented memory format called resistive random-access memory to create the first flexible data storage for wearable devices. The new format can be used in a thin, low-power form, making it ideal for inclusion in wearable electronics.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Kim’s team combined the thin data storage with a novel drug delivery system. The patch’s bottom layer is coated with porous silica nanoparticles loaded with drugs. Unlike a nicotine patch, the team’s device releases medication only when needed. A small heater in the patch automatically warms the nanoparticles, causing them to release their drug payloads into the skin, the team reported on Sunday in Nature Nanotechnology. A temperature sensor prevents the device from overheating and causing burns. Because flexible batteries and processors don’t yet exist for skin-based electronics, the device utilizes an external power source and processor. The patch covers an area comparable to a medium-sized adhesive bandage, and the researchers say the entire patch is thinner than a dime. “This could be a big deal for Parkinson’s disease patients,” Kim says. “The patient can attach the patch and forget about it without worrying about side effects or remembering to take pills.”Despite their benefits for wearable devices, flexible electronics including Kim’s remain cumbersome to manufacture and are currently built by hand one by one in university labs. A team of researchers led by John Rogers, a materials scientist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, has developed a way to incorporate widely available rigid electronic components into a structure that would still be flexible like Kim’s device. Rogers likens the prototype patch to a jelly doughnut: A transparent outer shell of flexible silicone rubber holds a small amount of silicone fluid similar in consistency to pancake syrup. Rigid components, purchased from suppliers and shaved down to a smaller size, float in the fluid, anchored at points to the outer shell. When the patch stretches with the skin, snakelike wires connecting the components unfurl like origami, allowing the rigid components to glide freely. As the patch contracts, the connectors return to their original positions, the team reports online today in Science. While the team’s research simplifies the manufacturing and lowers the cost of wearable electronics, the design is bulkier and less durable than those that use entirely flexible components such as Kim’s Parkinson’s patch.“This is certainly a bridge to a time when we can get all flexible parts,” Rogers says. “We can use components that are already commercially available to implement these ideas today. This lowers the cost of getting these devices into the world.”Although these recent innovations solve some of the problems facing wearable electronics, both Kim and Rogers admit that many major challenges remain before wide-scale adoption. Zhenan Bao, a chemical engineer developing similar wearable health sensors at Stanford University in California, says that some key components such as batteries and processors do not yet have a flexible form suitable for skin patches. “These two research projects show the field is steadily moving forward with new components made into stretchable form,” she says. “But more components are needed for these devices to be fully wearable and run on their own.”Kim proposes that smartphones and smart watches could provide remote power and processing to the wearable patches. He is now working on a method of using the wireless antennas in smartphones to transmit power over short distances with the potential to recharge or even replace batteries in wearable electronics. Outsourcing data crunching and transmission to an external device could also reduce the patches’ power consumption and reduce production costs.last_img read more

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Did Brazil’s uncontacted tribe receive proper medical care?

first_imgScientists and Brazil’s government disagree about whether the isolated Amazon tribespeople who came down with flu after making contact with the outside world last month received adequate medical treatment. At least one scientist fears that the illness is just the start of a health catastrophe for the tribe and blames the government for not taking fuller precautions before the tribespeople slipped back into the forest.According to new details disclosed by a senior official in Brazil’s Indian affairs department (FUNAI), the seven newly contacted tribespeople told an interpreter that they left their homeland after coming under fire by non-Indians possessing guns. They first exhibited flu symptoms on 30 June, 3 days after their first meeting with government officials in the Brazilian village of Simpatia. The group then vanished into the forest for 4 days.When they eventually reappeared in Simpatia on 4 July, a government medical team administered flu immunizations. Officials then took the sick tribespeople to a remote frontier post and gave them 6 days of medical treatment. Finally, on 11 July, they returned to their remote forest home, a village that may house as many as 100 individuals.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)After these medical interventions, the infected individuals pose no threat to their isolated tribe. So wrote Carlos Travassos, director of FUNAI’s General Coordination Unit of Isolated and Newly Contacted Indians, in a 22 July e-mail to Survival International, a nongovernmental organization based in London that supports tribal people.But anthropologist Kim Hill of Arizona State University, Tempe, says a health worker or anthropologist should have been sent with the departing individuals to administer antibiotics in the likely event that pneumonia and other secondary bacterial infections spread in the home village. Without properly administered antibiotics, Hill says, “a third to half of the population will die.” Based on his own and other anthropologists’ fieldwork with contacted Amazon tribes, Hill says the flu victims will likely infect others in their tribe with foreign viruses, and other secondary bacterial infections will take their toll in a weakened population. Travassos has declined to speak to Science about this.Virologist Frederick Hayden of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville says that although he does not know the particulars of this case, he thinks in general that the flu immunizations could do some good. Although the shots are not effective at treating the illness, they could protect the seven tribespeople from future exposure to flu. Moreover, Hayden notes that early treatment with influenza antiviral medications, such as Tamiflu or Relenza, could “shorten the duration of illness and reduce risk of lower respiratory tract infections.” Travassos, however, did not specifically mention such treatment in his e-mail. According to Travassos, FUNAI’s contact team gave the departing hunters and gatherers a primer in what influenza is, how it is spread, and what would happen if they didn’t return to Simpatia or FUNAI’s frontier post for further medical treatment in the event of a new outbreak. But Fiona Watson, research director for Survival International, thinks that the tribespeople may be too afraid to follow this advice. “Often tribal people associate villages with being the host of the infection,” she says. “They think the disease comes from there and they want to get away as soon as possible.”This reluctance to seek out outside medical help may bode poorly for those who acquire secondary respiratory infections, Hill says. In the mid-1980s, a group of Yora tribespeople who made contact with loggers in their region in the Peruvian Amazon were first infected by influenza and later came down with pneumonia and other secondary infections. Without antibiotics, “the old people died and all the young kids died,” Hill says. A subsequent study by medical anthropologist Glenn Shepard of the Paraense Emilio Goeldi Museum in Belém, Brazil, revealed that some 300 people died, between 50% and 60% of the population.last_img read more

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Chimpanzee ‘personhood’ fails on appeal

first_imgAdvocates of “legal personhood” to chimpanzees have lost another battle.This morning, a New York appellate court rejected a lawsuit by the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) to free a chimp named Tommy from captivity. The group had argued that the chimpanzee deserved the human right of bodily liberty.“The court nailed it,” writes Richard Cupp, a law professor at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, and a noted opponent of personhood for animals, in an e-mail to Science. “The decision directly addressed the arguments for nonhuman animal legal personhood, and demonstrated clearly why they are wrong.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The court’s decision is the latest setback for NhRP, an animal rights group that has been trying to free four New York chimpanzees—including two research chimps—since 2013. Two of the animals—Tommy and Kiko—live in cages on private property, according to the group. The other two—Hercules and Leo—are lab chimps at Stony Brook University.In each case, NhRP filed a writ of habeas corpus, which allows a person being held captive to have a say in court. Lower courts rejected the lawsuits late last year, but NhRP appealed, and the first of those appeals—involving Tommy—was heard this October. The group hopes to eventually extend its argument about the right to bodily liberty to a variety of other animals.In today’s decision, the court states that chimpanzees, although cognitively complex, aren’t entitled to the same legal status as human beings. “[We] conclude that a chimpanzee is not a ‘person’ entitled to the rights and protections afforded by the writ of habeas corpus,” the judges write. Only people can have rights, the court states, because only people can be held legally accountable for their actions. “In our view, it is this incapability to bear any legal responsibilities and societal duties that renders it inappropriate to confer upon chimpanzees the legal rights … that have been afforded to human beings.”Instead of trying to grant rights to chimpanzees, the court notes that NhRP could push for further legal protections for the animals, perhaps by advocating for stricter state animal welfare laws.Cupp agrees with that strategy. “If a chimpanzee hurts someone, he should not be subjected to a criminal trial and punishment,” he writes. “Although we have a moral duty to take very good care of them, rights and moral responsibilities do not fit chimpanzees.”   In an e-mail to Science, NhRP Executive Director Natalie Prosin says the judges’ reasoning is incorrect. “The Court ignores the fact that the common law is supposed to change in light of new scientific discoveries, changing experiences, and changing ideas of what is right or wrong,” she says. “It is time for the common law to recognize that these facts are sufficient to establish personhood for the purpose of a writ of habeas corpus.” NhRP, she says, will appeal the case to the state’s highest court.In the meantime, NhRP is pushing ahead with its other chimp cases. On Tuesday, it made oral arguments to another New York appellate court in the Kiko case, and it plans to appeal the Hercules and Leo case. It’s also moving ahead with personhood lawsuits in other states that will target both elephants and chimpanzees.last_img read more

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Whales amplify sound with their skull bones

first_imgThe loud, moaning calls of large, baleen whales—such as fin, right, gray, and blue whales—can travel hundreds of kilometers through the sea as the cetaceans reach out to contact others of their kind. Many of the whales’ calls are in the same low-frequency range as those produced by human activities, including military exercises, commercial shipping, and energy exploration. That overlap has led marine biologists to worry that the human cacophony may be harming the whales. (All baleen whale species are endangered, except the gray whale.) Yet it’s been difficult to devise regulations governing this noise, because scientists have not fully understood how sounds reach the baleen whales’ ear bones. Now, researchers report today in PLOS ONE that they’ve solved the mystery by means of a 3D computer model of a fin whale’s (Balaenoptera physalus) skull. They based their model on the skull of a young fin whale (seen in the photo above) that died in 2003 on a southern California beach. By simulating sound waves traveling through the computerized skull, the scientists discovered that the whales use an unusual mechanism for hearing: bone conduction. The fin whale’s skull bones (and likely those of other baleen whales) vibrate and amplify the low-frequency sounds, directing them to the ear bones. The discovery may help lawmakers set limits on the amount of noise humans can make in the deep sea.last_img read more

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How a British war memorial became a symbol of Dalit pride

first_imgAmbedkar’s visit to the battle site on January 1, 1927, revitalised the memory of the battle for the Dalit community, making it a rallying point and an assertion of pride.The Koregaon Ranstambh (victory pillar) is an obelisk in Bhima-Koregaon village commemorating the British East India Company soldiers who fell in a battle on January 1, 1818, where the British, with just 834 infantrymen — about 500 of them from the Mahar community — and 12 officers defeated the 28,000-strong army of Peshwa Bajirao II. It was one of the last battles of the Third Anglo-Maratha War, which ended the Peshwa domination.Read it at The Hindu Related Itemslast_img

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For Indian Students, The American Dream is Becoming a Canadian One

first_imgWith the US and the UK slowly shutting their doors, Canada has flung its open, and Indian students are rushing in.In 2017, Indian students who secured Canadian visas increased by almost 60% from a year ago, according to official data. In all, Indian students received 83,410 of the 317,110 Canadian study permits granted during the year.Read it at Quartz Related Itemslast_img

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Expats From India Keep Cricket Alive In Uruguay

first_imgEvery Sunday, close to a statue of Indian independence hero Mahatma Gandhi, a group of Indian expats take over a patch of land in Uruguay’s capital for a game of cricket.Tucked in between the Rio de la Plata estuary and the long promenade known as the “rambla” that stretches from one side of Montevideo to the other, Avijit Mukherjee prepares to bat, watched eagerly by his Uruguayan girlfriend.Read it at Tribune Related Itemslast_img

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