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Production Begins in Montréal on THE DISAPPEARANCE CTV and Super Écrans New

first_img Twitter About Productions CasablancaProductions Casablanca has carved a place in the television landscape with its original primetime productions. The company’s creative vision gives rise to stories and characters that resonate with a wide audience and offer quality content by providing creators with a production environment that measures up to their imaginations. This commitment to excellence was made possible by the company’s personal, intimate approach. Producer and founder Joanne Forgues favours quality over quantity in her choices. Passion, talent and perseverance are what motivate the company’s teams.About NBCUniversal International Studios NBCUniversal International Studios delivers award-winning international television to millions across the globe. Based in London, NBCUniversal International Studios’ in-house production labels include: Carnival Films, makers of The Last Kingdom for BBC Two, Sky 1’s most-watched drama, Stan Lee’s Lucky Man and creators of the Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning drama sensation Downton Abbey; Monkey, producers of upcoming Channel 4 game show, Question Jury, Bravo’s Newlyweds: The First Year, and Channel 4’s hit UK reality series, Made in Chelsea; factual entertainment label Chocolate Media, makers of Channel 4’s Restoring Britain’s Landmarks, Sky 1’s Driving School of Mum and Dad and Channel 5’s Inside Manchester’s Midland Hotel; Lucky Giant, producers of upcoming BBC Two scripted comedy, Quacks; and Australian-based Matchbox Pictures, makers of critically-acclaimed drama series The Nowhere Boys, Glitch, The Slap and The Real Housewives of Melbourne.Additionally, NBCUniversal International Studios operates a joint production venture with Working Title Television and Heyday Television and has a first look deal with Hardy Son & Baker and 87 Films.It also operates a prolific global formats business, and owns Tellycopter, a research and development resource that sits alongside its production companies.About Super ÉcranSuper Écran is the only premium French-language network in Canada that broadcasts TV premieres of films, exclusive and original series, and variety shows. Super Écran offers commercial-free viewing on four channels available in HD, with five new films every weekend. Super Écran is also available via On Demand, online and through the Super Écran GO app. Super Écran is a division of Bell Media.About Bell Media Independent ProductionBell Media has commissioned some of Canada’s most-watched and most-acclaimed original programming, working with the best Canadian independent producers in the country. Hit series commissioned by CTV include ratings success stories SAVING HOPE, and the record-breaking THE AMAZING RACE CANADA, and MASTERCHEF CANADA. Upcoming original series on CTV include CARDINAL and THE DISAPPEARANCE. Among the original scripted series on Bell Media pay, specialty, and streaming platforms are the internationally acclaimed ORPHAN BLACK, Space’s most-watched original series KILLJOYS, Bravo’s award-winning and most-watched original drama 19-2, award-winning dramedy SENSITIVE SKIN, CraveTV’s first original series LETTERKENNY, Discovery’s upcoming drama FRONTIER, and Comedy’s new satirical news series THE BEAVERTON. Discovery is also home to Bell Media’s hit factual series HIGHWAY THRU HELL, COLD WATER COWBOYS, and CANADA’S WORST DRIVER, among others. Bell Media is one of the first media companies in North America to commit to producing all new scripted series in 4K.About CTVCTV is Canada’s #1 private broadcaster. Featuring a wide range of quality news, sports, information, and entertainment programming, CTV has been Canada’s most-watched television network for the past 14 years in a row. CTV is a division of Bell Media, Canada’s premier multimedia company with leading assets in television, radio, digital, and Out-of-Home. Bell Media is owned by BCE Inc. (TSX, NYSE: BCE), Canada’s largest communications company. More information about CTV can be found on the network’s website at CTV.ca. Advertisement “With production now underway in Montréal, it’s the beginning of an exciting and emotionally gripping six-episode journey,” said Corrie Coe, Senior Vice-President, Independent Productions, Bell Media. “We’re honoured to be working with strong production partners and an immensely talented ensemble cast, and can’t wait to introducing viewers to THE DISAPPEARANCE in 2017.“We are excited to begin production on THE DISAPPEARANCE, our first English project in association with CTV and Super Écran, said Joanne Forgues, Producer, Productions Casablanca. “We are also thrilled to work with such talented writers, Peter Stebbings as a director, and this exceptional cast who will all bring out the quality of this project. We are so proud to have NBCUniversal International Studios as our international distributor.”JoAnn Alfano, EVP, Scripted Programming at NBCUniversal International Studios comments: “THE DISAPPEARANCE is an exceptional series that will resonate with viewers in Canada and the world over. With complex characters and a riveting universal story, this series has equal parts heart, emotion, suspense, intrigue and mystery.”THE DISAPPEARANCE was first put into development by CTV in October 2015. The series is created and written by the Montréal-based writing team of Normand Daneau and Geneviève Simard. The series is produced by Joanne Forgues and Sophie Parizeau of Productions Casablanca, creators of the Prix Gémeaux-winning series, Les invincibles and Série noire, and is executive produced by Joanne Forgues and Jean-Marc Casanova. Emmy Award-winning JoAnn Alfano (You, Me and the Apocalypse, Resurrection & 30 Rock) will executive produce for NBCUniversal International Studios. The series is directed by Peter Stebbings.THE DISAPPEARANCE is produced by Productions Casablanca in association with Bell Media and NBCUniversal International Studios, with the financial participation of the Canada Media Fund, the Cogeco Program Development Fund and the assistance of the Québec Film and Television Tax Credit and the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit. Super Écran has commissioned the series for French-language broadcast. NBCUniversal International Studios serves as international distributor.For Bell Media, Gosia Kamela is Production Executive; Tom Hastings is Director, Drama, Independent Production; and Corrie Coe is Senior Vice-President, Independent Production. Mike Cosentino is Senior Vice-President, CTV and Specialty. Randy Lennox is President, Broadcasting and Content, Bell Media. @CTV_PR @CTV_Television @superecran @adenyoungRTFY – Aden Young @CamilleSully – Camille Sullivan www.facebook.com/CTV Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement CTV and Super Écran, alongside award-winning Montréal-based Productions Casablanca and NBCUniversal International Studios, announced today that production has begun on THE DISAPPEARANCE, the networks’ new six-part limited run event series. Directed by Peter Stebbings (Defendor, ORPHAN BLACK), the character driven mystery drama begins shooting in 4K in Montréal today. THE DISAPPEARANCE is set to premiere as part of CTV and Super Écran’s 2016/2017 mid-season schedule. NBCUniversal International Studios will act as international distributor.Also announced today are the members of the cast, which features Peter Coyote (E.T.) as retired judge and prosecutor Henry Sullivan; Aden Young (RECTIFY) as Luke Sullivan, Henry’s son, and a scruffy, soulful musician; Joanne Kelly (WAREHOUSE 13) as Catherine Sullivan, Henry’s daughter and Luke’s sister, and a funny, devoted palliative care nurse; Camille Sullivan (THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE) as Helen Murphy Sullivan, Luke’s ex-wife, a microbiologist, and devoted mother; Micheline Lanctôt (UNITÉ 9) as Susan Bowden, a tough, experienced Lieutenant-Detective; and Kevin Parent (CAFÉ DE FLORE) as Sergeant-Detective Charles Cooper, and Susan’s partner.THE DISAPPEARANCE is a psychological family drama centered around the unexplained and sudden disappearance of Anthony Sullivan during a treasure hunt on the day of his tenth birthday. The series follows the family as the complex and emotionally fraught mystery of their child’s disappearance unfolds. While both the police and family conduct their own investigations, seeking any signs and trace of evidence, long-buried familial secrets with devastating consequences rise to the surface leaving an unforeseen impact on every member of the Sullivan family. Login/Register With: Advertisement Social Media linkslast_img read more

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WHATS SHOOTING IN MONTREAL – AS OF OCT2716

first_img Facebook Pre-ProductionLove Locks(TV movie)Director: Martin WoodProduction Manager: tbcCasting: Elite CastingBkg. Casting: Nick Walker nick@elitecastingcanada.comStunt Coord.: tbcPre-prod ’til: November 20, 2016Shooting ’til: December 21, 2016Tel: tbcA Worthy Companion(feature)Director: Carlo Sanchez & Jason SanchezProduction Manager: tbcCasting: Elite CastingBkg. Casting: Nick WalkerStunt Coord.: n/aPre-prod ’til: October 2016Shooting ’til: December 2016Tel: tbcCircus Kids(series)Director: tbcProduction Manager: tbcCasting: Elite CastingBkg. Casting: Nick WalkerStunt Coord.: n/aPre-prod ’til: 2017Shooting ’til: 2017Tel: tbcPost-ProductionDay 6Tel: 514-447-2943VenusTel: 514-842-5324The Art of More 2Tel: 514.932.2580Incendo Tel: 514-866-4567COURTESY OF ACTRA MONTREAL Advertisement Real Detective 2(series)Director: tbcLine Producer: tbcCasting: Kenyon/Wells CastingBkg. Casting: Montreal CastingStunt Coord.: tbcShooting ’til: November 25, 2016Tel: tbcThe Disappearance(mini-series)Director: Peter StebbingsProduction Manager: Marie-Laure MerriauxCasting: Kenyon/Wells CastingBkg. Casting: n/aStunt Coord.: tbcShooting ’til: December 10, 2016Tel: 514-276-179219-2 season 4(series)Director: tbcProduction Manager: tbcCasting: Kenyon/Wells CastingBkg. Casting: Carole DionneStunt Coord.: tbcShooting ’til: December 14, 2016Tel: tbcSons of God(feature)Director: Fred GrivoisProduction Manager: tbcCasting: Elite CastingBkg. Casting: Nick WalkerStunt Coord.: n/aShooting ’til: October 6, 2016Tel: tbcBrad’s Status(feature)Director: Mike WhiteProduction Manager: Tina KontosCasting: Kenyon/Wells CastingBkg. Casting: Nick WalkerStunt Coord.: n/aShooting ’til: November 13, 2016Tel: 514.447.0292Incendo #5(TV movie)Director: tbcProduction Manager: Simon-Pier BelangerCasting: Lewis Kay CastingBkg. Casting: Nick Walker nick.walker@montrealcasting.caStunt Coord.: tbcShooting ’til: November 17, 2016Tel: 514-866-4567 Advertisement Shooting Now21 Thunder(tv series)Director: n/aProduction Manager: Jacqueline LavoieCasting: Kenyon/Wells CastingBkg. Casting: Johanne TitleyStunt Coord.: Tyler HallShooting ’til: November 15, 2016Tel: 514.903.7991Bellevue(series)Director: tbcProduction Manager: tbcCasting: Kenyon/Wells CastingBkg. Casting: Julie BretonStunt Coord.: tbcShooting ’til: December 9, 2016Tel: 514-932-2580center_img Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

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Meet the Toronto woman who created nude lingerie for all skin tones

first_imgIt’s 2018 so by now, you’d hope that representation for women of colour–in all aspects of life–would be rich, abundant, and consistent. Unfortunately, it’s not. Toronto designer Chantal Carter Taylor, however, is changing things up for the lingerie world. Advertisement Twitter Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Her intimates line, Love & Nudes, aims to represent all women with its diverse range of nude lingerie. Designed with women of colour in mind, Love & Nudes has four shades of nude underwear (Espresso Empress, Knockout Nutmeg, Butterscotch Beauty and Honey Love) that pair perfectly with a wide range of skintones. Using a handy foundation chart or even printable swatches, you can choose which colour is right for you.last_img read more

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CBC is destroying its broadcast archives after theyre digitized

first_imgOTTAWA—A charitable group dedicated to preserving the country’s broadcasting heritage is calling on the CBC to stop destroying original television and radio broadcast materials as it moves to digitize the content.The Canadian Broadcast Museum Foundation says the public broadcaster’s English service earlier this month began destroying acetate transcriptions, as well as audio and video recordings that span eight decades, after converting the master copies into a digital format.The foundation asked the CBC earlier this year for time to find a suitable space to archive and preserve the material, but says it was turned down. Advertisement Login/Register With: But a spokesman for the broadcaster says it was being done only after the content was digitized under its own, strict archiving guidelines.“Our focus is on preservation of content and if we do not digitize this content, it will be lost,” said Chuck Thompson, head of public affairs for CBC English Services.“With that in mind, between now and June 30, CBC intends to proceed with the safe and environmentally responsible destruction of those carriers which have been digitized, so long as our standards for media quality and data security have been met,” he said in an email.The foundation raised concerns about losing the original recordings in a letter last month to Heritage Minister Melanie Joly.It told the minister a plan was in the works to store the CBC’s archival content in the decommissioned underground NORAD Canadian Forces base in North Bay, but that it couldn’t meet a March 31 deadline to transfer the materials and asked the minister to delay destruction of CBC’s original English-language programming.A spokesman for Joly declined comment, calling it a CBC decision.Kealy Wilkinson, the foundation’s executive director, called the destruction of the content “truly disturbing.”“At a time when Canada is finally committed to sustain and support Indigenous cultures, it has become the first developed nation to systematically destroy master recordings of its largest audiovisual heritage collection, our English-language radio and television artifacts.”The CBC said it had already digitized over 20 per cent of its content and would accelerate the process over the next five to eight years.“We are investing in the digitization of our audio and video media to protect and preserve our archives, to make them easier for our production teams to access and for Canadians to rediscover,” Thompson said in an email, noting that the CBC is recognized among its peer broadcasters as an industry leader in archival preservation.Thompson added that the equipment needed to play the original recordings had become obsolete or would require “significant maintenance.”But internationally accepted standards and best practices of audiovisual preservation call for retention of originals, due to the unknown characteristics of digitization, such as long-term stability and vulnerability to electromagnetic interference, the foundation said.It also questioned why Radio-Canada was preserving its master recordings after making digital copies but CBC had opted to rely only on digital copies.“Such inequitable treatment of cultural treasures is not acceptable,” said Wilkinson.BY TERRY PEDWELL | The Canadian Press LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Facebook Twitter It notes that Radio-Canada, the public broadcaster’s French-language service, intends to retain its master recordings after making digital copies.The CBC acknowledges it started this month to destroy original recordings that had been converted and would continue to do so until the end of June.last_img read more

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Canadas best in comedy compete for a spot in SiriusXMs Top Comic

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Beginning at 10 am ET today through 11:59 pm ET on August 17, Canadians can view the audition videos of the 18 semi-finalists and vote daily for the funniest comics at siriusxm.ca/topcomic. The six comics who receive the greatest number of public votes – and laughs – will advance to the Finale, along with two additional comics selected by an esteemed panel of industry judges to compete live on stage for the coveted title of SiriusXM’s Top Comic, a grand prize of $25,000and more.Canadians can vote daily starting today through August 17 at siriusxm.ca/topcomic LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The 2018 SiriusXM Top Comic semi-finalists are:Kyle Brownrigg (Hometown—Ottawa, ON)Sophie Buddle (Hometown—Ottawa, ON)Cara Connors (Hometown—Toronto, ON)Mark DeBonis (Hometown— Scarborough, ON)Dave Harris (Hometown—New Westminster, BC)Gilson Lubin (Hometown—Toronto, ON)Brittany Lyseng (Hometown—Calgary, AB)Roman Mancini (Hometown—Ottawa, ON)Chanty Marostica (Hometown—Winnipeg, MB)Ashley Moffatt (Hometown—Hamilton, ON)Myles Morrison (Hometown—Saskatoon, SK)Efthimios Nasiopoulos (Hometown—Toronto, ON)Tim Nutt (Hometown—Vancouver, BC)Alex Pavone (Hometown—Woodbridge, ON)Keith Pedro (Hometown—Toronto, ON)Nick Reynoldson (Hometown—Scarborough, ON)Shirley Whalen (Hometown—Fort McMurray, AB)Ryan Williams (Hometown—Kamloops, BC)Finalists will be announced later this summer.“It’s no secret that Canada is home to some of the world’s funniest people, which made it a real challenge to pick just 18 from our recent auditions,” said Ben Miner, Canadian comic and host of SiriusXM’s Canada Laughs. “We’re excited to continue to shine a light on our incredible homegrown comedic talent, and let the country have a hand in choosing our finalists from this hilarious group.”SiriusXM recently selected 60 of the nation’s best comics to take part in public auditions held over six nights in Torontoand Calgary. The comics each had six minutes to impress the crowd and a panel of industry judges, who chose three comics from each night to continue on in the competition as semi-finalists.For the first time in the competition’s history, the two runners-up will each receive cash prizes of $2,500. In addition to $25,000, the grand prize winner will receive international exposure with a guaranteed spot to perform at JFL Sydney(Australia), as well as at JFL42 (Toronto), JFL NorthWest (Vancouver), and at Just For Laughs Montreal on a JFL TV taping airing on a Bell property in their 2019/20 broadcast season. Tickets for the Finale are on sale now at jfl42.com/act/siriusxm-top-comic.Top Comic is part of SiriusXM Canada’s ongoing initiatives to provide exposure to Canadian talent. Last year, Gavin Mattsof New Westminster, BC took home the title and grand prize, with Sterling Scott of Edmonton, AB and Graham Chittenden of Brantford, ON placing as runners-up. Previous winners include Chris Robinson, Faisal Butt, Pete Zedlacher, Eric Andrews, Matt O’Brien and Brian Stollery.Canada Laughs (ch. 168) features uncensored Canadian comedy 24/7 including stand-up, sketch and more, putting the spotlight on the rich pool of extraordinary talent from Canada. Canada Laughs is available to all Sirius and XM subscribers in Canada and across the U.S. and joins SiriusXM’s hilarious comedy lineup, including Kevin Hart’s Laugh Out Loud Radio, Comedy Central Radio, SiriusXM Comedy Greats, Raw Dog Comedy, Jeff and Larry’s Comedy Roundup, Laugh USA and more.About SiriusXM CanadaSiriusXM Canada Holdings Inc., operating as SiriusXM Canada, is the country’s leading entertainment company. SiriusXM creates and offers commercial-free music; premier sports talk and live events; comedy; news; and exclusive talk and entertainment. SiriusXM is available in vehicles from every major car company and on smartphones and other connected devices as well as online at siriusxm.ca.Join SiriusXM Canada on Facebook at facebook.com/siriusxmcanada, on Twitter at @siriusxmcanada, on Instagram at @siriusxmcanada and on YouTube at youtube.com/siriusxmcanada.SiriusXM radios and accessories are available from retailers nationwide and online at SiriusXM. In addition, SiriusXM Music for Business provides commercial-free music to a variety of businesses. SiriusXM is also a leading provider of connected vehicles services, giving customers access to a suite of safety, security, and convenience services including automatic crash notification, stolen vehicle recovery assistance, enhanced roadside assistance and turn-by-turn navigation.SiriusXM Canada has been designated one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies nine years in a row and is currently a Platinum Club Member.About JFL42Established in 2012 and now in its seventh year, JFL42 is a pass-based interactive comedy Festival in Toronto created by Group Just For Laughs. Developed with a mandate to celebrate the most hilarious, innovative, riveting and relevant comedy experiences in the world with Toronto audiences, JFL42’s unique interactive pass-based ticketing and reservation system makes it the first comedy festival of its kind. In addition to JFL42, Just For Laughs has produced the world’s most prestigious comedy festival in Montreal for the past 35 years and in recent years has launched festivals in Sydney, Vancouver, and London, England. Advertisementcenter_img TORONTO, July 27, 2018 – SiriusXM Canada, the country’s leading audio entertainment company, today revealed the 18 semi-finalists for the 9th annual SiriusXM Top Comic competition, a nationwide search for Canada’s best in comedy. Canadians will hold the fate of the semi-finalists in their hands by choosing which comics will move on in the competition, where they’ll battle it out joke-for-joke live on stage at the SiriusXM Top Comic Finale. The Finale, featuring headlining comedian Nikki Glaser, takes place September 27, 2018 at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre as part of JFL42 in association with SiriusXM Canada in Toronto. Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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VANCOUVER FILMED HALLMARK SERIES CUTS TIES WITH LORI LOUGHLIN FOLLOWING FRAUD CHARGES

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Her former series, which was shot in Langley, was in the middle of its sixth season when Loughlin was charged earlier this week.One day before Crown Media Family’s decision, a U.S. federal court judge granted Loughlin permission to return to British Columbia to continue working on her Hallmark projects.Apart from travelling to the Vancouver area, the actor is only allowed to move within the continental U.S.Loughlin is charged with mail fraud and honest service mail fraud in the alleged bribery scheme. Authorities allege she and her husband paid US$500,000 to have their daughters labeled as crew team recruits at the University of Southern California, even though neither was a rower.Loughlin has not responded publicly to the allegations or entered a plea in the case, and didn’t speak in court Wednesday except to give one-word answers to the judge’s questions.CTV NEWS ~ With files from The Associated Press  UPDATED:  TWITTER STATEMENTS FROM HALLMARK CHANNELThe series will not air this Sunday March 17 while we are evaluating all creative options around the When Calls the Heart series. #Hearties please keep checking back to our social for all updates related to the beloved When Calls The Heart. pic.twitter.com/8sVTlJN21n— Hallmark Channel (@hallmarkchannel) March 14, 2019 Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement We are saddened by the recent news surrounding the college admissions allegations. We are no longer working with Lori Loughlin and have stopped development of all productions featuring Lori on the Crown Media Family Network channels — including #GarageSaleMysteries. pic.twitter.com/VDisz1J3SU— Hallmark Channel (@hallmarkchannel) March 14, 2019 Advertisement In this Oct. 4, 2017 photo, actress Lori Loughlin arrives at the 5th annual People Magazine “Ones To Watch” party in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File) Twitter The Hallmark Channel has announced its no longer working with Lori Loughlin in light of her arrest in the sprawling U.S. college admissions cheating case.The channel’s parent company, Crown Media Family Networks, issued a statement Thursday revealing it has stopped development of all productions involving the “Fuller House” star.Loughlin had been working on two Hallmark Channel projects filmed in Metro Vancouver, the TV series “When Calls the Heart” and the “Garage Sale Mysteries” movies.last_img read more

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Alberta Metis continue hunting court battle

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Metis Nation of Alberta continues its fight for the right to hunt.The Metis Nation was in court Wednesday to appeal the December 2010 decision that states they don’t have hunting rights in southern Alberta.APTN National News reporter Keith Laboucan was in Medicine Hat, Alta., to report on the story.last_img

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First Nations peoples sytematically excluded from juries Ontario coroner

first_imgAPTN National NewsA coroner’s ruling in Northern Ontario is supporting the claims of First Nations in the area that juries are excluding Aboriginal people.The Ontario government is already planning an inquiry into the issue.It’s important because juries are used not only in trials, but in the proceedings such as corner’s inquests where a jury makes findings and recommendations.As APTN National News reporter Tiar Wilson found out, in Thunder Bay, Ont., this challenge to the legal system was sparked by a series of tragedies.last_img

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Nunavut minister steps down

first_imgAPTN National NewsFred Schell, Nunavut’s cabinet minister of nothing, stepped down yesterday just before members of the legislative assembly were set to vote for his removal.It was months ago that Schell was stripped of his cabinet roles, but not the position or salary. Schell had previously been found guilty of violating the Integrity Act six times, fined $10,000, but in his seven months as a minister without a portfolio, he continued to pocket a minister’s salary.After a lengthy statement, Schell stepped down.APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll has been following this story.last_img

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Canadian border agent charged with possessing child porn

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsA Canadian border guard stationed at a controversial customs post on the edge of Akwesasne has been snared in a massive child porn sweep launched by the OPP.The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) on Friday confirmed border agent Mathieu Pahle was charged by the OPP with possesion of child porgnography. Pahle, 32, was stationed at the customs border post in Cornwall, Ont., which is situated at the foot of a new low-level bridge which spans the St. Lawrence River and connects to Cornwall Island in Akwesasne.“The CBSA has been alerted to the incident and we are fully co-operating with the police. We can confirm that Mathieu Pahle is a CBSA employee,” said the statement. “Allegations of improper or illegal behaviour by our staff are taken very seriously by the CBSA and are thoroughly investigated by CBSA’s professional standards investigation section.”The agency said it could not comment any further on the issue because it is now a criminal matter in the hands of the court.The statement did not say whether Pagle is still on the job or if any of CBSA’s computers became part of the investigationPahle is scheduled appear in Cornwall provincial court on Oct. 30.The OPP executed a total of 99 search warrants across the province during its anti-child porn operation. The Ontario police agency said it charged 60 people with a total of about 249 counts of child pornography related infractions. OPP investigators also identified 14 child victims during the investigation.The Cornwall CBSA border post also acts as a check-point which routinely screens individuals leaving Cornwall Island, even if they never left Canada. Akwesasne’s Cornwall Island is within Canadian territory.Many residents on the island complain of harassment by CBSA agents at the border post which must be crossed when travelling to Cornwall. Mundane trips for shopping or for medical appointments can be interrupted by orders to submit to secondary inspection, even if the individual never left Canada.CBSA agents are legally allowed to order secondary inspections for anyone crossing a border post.The border post once sat on the island, but Akwesasne forced its relocation after the community refused to allow armed border guards on Mohawk land.Akwesasne straddles the Canada-U.S. border about 120 kilometres west of Montreal. The region has gained notoriety as a high traffic smuggling route for tobacco, marijuana, people and weapons.jbarrera@atpn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Ontario First Nation prepares for the worst as water rises on the

first_img(View of the Albany River from the Fort Albany First Nation, 8 kilometres to the south: Courtesy: Fort Albany Flood Watch)Annette FrancisAPTN National NewsKAPUSKASING –The Kashechewan First Nation in Ontario is preparing for a Stage one evacuation and some residents could be in the air within a few days.The Cree community is no stranger to evacuation orders and it seems 2015 will be no different.This year, the dam that keeps the Albany river at bay is deteriorating and officials are arranging transport and lodging.That’s why Gerry Demeules is busy 24-7 these days.The evaucation coordinator for the city of Kapuskasing has just returned from Kashechewan and is wasting no time getting back to work.After the one hour flight, he’s back on the phone making calls to local motel owners, hoping to secure enough beds for the latest influx of evacuees.Demeules said the first to be flown out will be the elderly, the sick and young children.“Our community is pretty well one of the biggest communities in the north when it comes to providing good hospital care,” said Demeules. “So thats why we stepped up to be a stage one centre.”Demeules is no stranger to this type of evacuation preparedness.Since 2006, the City of Kapuskasing, 320 kilometres west of Kashechewan, has been host to evacuees in their time of need.“So from there we’ve learned a lot from our mistakes,” Demeules told APTN National News. “And we’re to the point now where we’re basically the first phone call from the province.”Can’t go homeKapuskasing is currently playing host to 400 evacuees from Kashechewan who have not been able to return home after last year’s flood.Desmeule said the city has plans to help once again and this year, a new plan is in place.Based on the city’s coordination experience, he said Kapuskasing will act as the hub. Then evacuees will be flown to other communities that are willing to act as host communities.Demeules said the other northern communities that are on board this year are Hearst, Smooth Rock Falls and Constance Lake First Nation.“We’re looking at about 800 people that we can house within a couple hours of each other,” said Demueles.It would mean families and friends can visit and relieve some of the stress he said.afrancis@aptn.caAnnette Francis is in Kapuskasing and is travelling to Kashechewan later this week. She will continue to file stories as the situation developslast_img read more

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Chief wants province to dig into possible remains at former Edmonton Indian

first_imgBrandi Morin APTN National News The chief of the Papaschase band in Edmonton said it’s time Alberta looked into whether there are bodies buried at the former Charles Camsell Indian Hospital site.“I’ve been looking into this for years,” said Chief Calvin Bruneau. “The province needs to investigate and do archaeological testing.”The segregated hospital was set up in Edmonton in the late 1940s to treat First Nations, Metis and Inuit patients mainly as a sanatorium for tuberculosis (TB). Those infected with the deadly disease were brought in fromacross the prairies and the NWT. Many times they never made it back home again.Bruneau believes there’s a possible burial site of unmarked graves located on the southeast corner of the hospital property. And the province should split the costs with the federal government to pay for the costs of looking into it. Several of his band members and relatives were treated at the hospital.“The governments should foot the bill and deal with it properly. There should be elders and spiritual people involved too. We need to look at the circumstances as to why people were buried there and provide answers to families. These could be their long lost relatives,” said Bruneau.Over the years rumours have swirled about abuse, sterilization, experiments, and shock treatments that took place there.“We do know that there was experiments going on at the hospital and people died under dubious circumstances, not just TB,” said Bruneau.Two years ago Bruneau met with a representative from the Alberta Ministry of Culture and Tourism to talk about his concerns. He said they reviewed old newspaper clippings and other archival documents to look for evidence of burial sites at the hospital grounds. Nothing was found. But Bruneau thinks the burials were most likely undocumented.A government official told APTN that the hospital had an agreement with the St. Albert’s residential school to use its graveyard. And the hospital site didn’t offer any evidence of graves.This isn’t the first time Bruneau has dealt with finding of the remains of his ancestors.In 2001, the city of Edmonton unearthed a burial ground of Papaschase descendants during a bridge reconstruction. The city and province worked with band members to establish a memorial in the area and to redirect construction of the bridge.Bruneau has reached out to the new owners of the property, one of which is developer and architect Gene Dub who bought it from the province in 2004.Dub and his partners bought the property for $3.6 million but ended up spending $5 million more after having to remove asbestos from inside the building. The original Indian hospital was torn down in the late ’60s and a new hospital was constructed on the property and made public until it deteriorated and closed in 1996.Now it’s being turned into an apartment complex.Since the 13 years of purchasing the property Dub has become acquainted with the history of the Indian hospital that once stood there.“When we purchased the building we weren’t aware of the history, the provincial government just put it up as is…regarding the history I’ve certainly read a lot about it and am familiar with it now,” said Dub.Dub said he hasn’t found any evidence of a graveyard on site, but is taking the necessary precautions just in case.“We’ve sent a letter to the city that said we will stop working immediately if we come across a bone or something. If there was a place that people were buried it would be where the building is located now. We have informed any person working on the site that comes across any bones that might appear to be a grave to stop,” said Dub.But the hospital site is rumoured to be one of the most haunted buildings in Alberta.“I think most of that kind of haunting is not Aboriginal spiritual haunting- it’s public haunting. People are not even aware that this is not the building that Aboriginal’s were housed. Usually it’s kids breaking in. Most of the haunted rumours have nothing to do with Aboriginals, they’re just media hype,” said Dub.But they did bring an Indigenous elder in to bless the four corners of the property- just in case.“The idea was that there was some bad spirits in the building. That’s why we approached the chief to conduct ceremonies,” explained Dub.Some patients who died were buried in a cemetery in the Enoch Cree Nation and Winterburn area west of Edmonton. Other bodies were taken to the Edmonton Indian Residential School 20 km northwest of the city.George Muldoe remembers being asked to bury someone brought there from the hospital while attending residential school when he was just 11 years old in the 1950s.“It was- we had no choice, we had to do it,” said Muldoe. “They’d give you a pick and a shovel and that was it.”There is a memorial at the former school grounds recognizing a mass burial site. But Muldoe said there are more unmarked graves littered all over the area. The hospital used the school yard as its dumping grounds.“There was never a preacher, nobody. No family. Just a truck would drop a body off right on the ground and leave,” said Muldoe.Along with the abuses, he faced at residential school Muldoe said the experience with the graves have haunted him for over 30 years. When he swore an affidavit about his experiences during the residential school compensation process, he said his claims weren’t taken seriously.“The church, Canada and some authors keep calling me a liar,” and he wasn’t the only one who dug graves and buried the dead there. Some of his old classmates had to do the deed as well, he said.For many the hospital was a place of isolation and loneliness.Dub said had he known the history of the property he would’ve never got involved with it.“I think the government should’ve dealt with it. I think they should’ve done something with the project…that would help the Aboriginal cause. We’re scrambling just to keep ahead for us to- the government should’ve given the building to Aboriginals,” said Dub.They are still awaiting additional financing and the final permit from the city to move ahead. Plans to dedicate a memorial in the northeast corner on an acre of the property recognizing the experiences of the Indian hospital are in the works.But Bruneau wants to see more than a memorial. He wants answers.Pamela Mayne Correia, curator in the department of Anthropology at the University of Alberta said there’s no miracle way of finding out if there are graves there other than to start digging.“There is ground penetrating radar or you can dig down physically to find a grave,” she said, “You won’t know for sure unless you do that.”With the findings of mass burial sites discovered at various residential school locations across the country that remained hidden for years after, Bruneau said the same atrocities probably happened at places like the Charles Camsell Indian Hospital.“I would like to see it (grave) found and then figure out how to deal with it,” said Bruneau.Restitution is needed, he continued, especially because both the federal and provincial governments are championing reconciliation and nation to nation building relationships.“There has to be some kind of restitution,” he said.bmorin@aptn.calast_img read more

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We have to live with these changes everyday Norway House still struggling

first_imgAPTN News requested an interview with Manitoba Hydro for this series. They declined, but spokesperson Bruce Owen emailed a written statement.“We recognize the impact hydro-electric development has had on many Indigenous communities,” he says. “We also recognize that resolving past grievances is fundamental to strengthening our relationships with Indigenous communities.”APTN also reached out to Manitoba’s Minister of Indigenous and Northern Relations, Eileen Clarke, who declined our interview request.“Hydro has altered our way of life,” Clarke says, standing on the shore at Two-Mile Channel after showing Wa Ni Ska Tan members how Hydro re-engineered the land and waters between Playgreen Lake and Lake Winnipeg.“It’s altered everything. And what upsets me is they don’t show us proper regard or respect,” he continues.“Sure, the damage is done already, but how can we minimize it? How can we help the lake survive?“Someday I want to see my grandchildren…or my sons, continue this way of life that I’ve enjoyed.“Trapping, hunting, fishing. It’s who we are as Cree people. The lake and the land were loaned to us by the Creator for us to survive. I want people to understand that. Life is not all rosy, and we have issues to deal with, but we try our best to live.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewsabrandson@aptn.ca@ashleybrandson “We have to live with these changes every day…”Clarke is president of the Norway House Fisherman’s Cooperative, which represents 50 local fishers who work in a struggling industry harvesting fish from Playgreen Lake, Lake Winnipeg and Kiskittogisu Lake.Today he’s taking Wa Ni Ska Tan alliance members out in boat to show them the impacts hydro development has had on the waters and fisheries.The boat weaves through a channel, a few kilometres outside of Norway House, with cabins and homes scattered along the shore.A crane towers above the tall grasses along the banks and watches the boat pass by.Minutes later the channel opens up, revealing beams of sunlight glimmering on Playgreen Lake’s pale green waters. There is slight wind.The boat passes dozens of islands, some of them new, some reduced to the bedrock that once sat below their soil and vegetation, and others completely submerged underwater.All of the islands have eroded as a result of fluctuating water levels controlled by Manitoba Hydro; they’re a danger to fishermen and others who use the lake, Clarke explains.(The Norway House Fisherman’s Co-op, established in 1962, represents 50 commercial fishers from the Norway House area. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)A 20-minute boat ride takes the alliance members—there to witness and document the impacts of hydro development on local people and communities—to a small plant owned by the Fisherman’s Co-op.It’s here the fishermen land their catches of whitefish, pickerel and sauger and package it for transportation by truck 800 kilometres to Winnipeg, where the fish is further processed and marketed.Standing on the dock and peering out at the lake, Clarke says the co-op’s fishers are working with a significantly reduced quota and often struggle to make ends meet.“The silting is killing this lake because it’s killing the oxygen: the plant life, the fish — the fish can’t spawn here anymore.”(Lands were blasted and excavated to create Two-Mile Channel, which connects Playgreen Lake to Lake Winnipeg. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)He says sturgeon—culturally significant to the Cree but now listed as an endangered species—were once plentiful in the lake but have almost entirely disappeared since the wave of hydro development in the region four decades ago.Clarke says trees are constantly falling into the lake due to the shoreline erosion, and that they pose a safety risk to fishermen.As in other hydro-impacted communities, Manitoba Hydro pays locals from Norway House to retrieve trees and other debris in order to reduce the safety risk, he explains.Fluctuating water levels also create air pockets beneath the ice in wintertime, like the one Clarke fell through a few years ago.Some have given up fishing altogether, he says.“We have to live with these changes everyday. Day in, day out, while we’re out here trying to make a living, providing for our families.”Dispossessed by hydroIn the 1960s, Manitoba and the federal government jointly explored the hydro potential of the Nelson River as a source of power for the growing energy needs in the south.The Nelson drains into Lake Winnipeg and runs more than 600 kilometres to Hudson Bay.With a drainage basin that spans more than 1 million square kilometres across multiple provinces, it’s also an important waterway for the Cree, Metis and other Indigenous peoples in the region.But by the 1970s, Manitoba Hydro had turned the river, its tributaries, and other waterways in the region into energy-and-profit-producing entities.According to Hydro’s website, The Churchill River Diversion (CRD) “was created to increase the water flow to our large generating stations on the lower Nelson River”, with most of the Churchill’s flow “diverted at Southern Indian Lake into the Nelson River.”Hydro describes a network of dams and channels that control the river’s flow into South Indian Lake and Split Lake, with the outcome being an average of “25% more water [flowing] into the Nelson River system.”At the same time, as it was re-engineering the Churchill River system, Hydro also undertook the Lake Winnipeg Regulation (LWR), another massive engineering feat that “created a second outlet for Lake Winnipeg and a network of channels and structures,” according to Hydro’s website.Hydro boasts that the Jenpeg dam and a series of diversion channels “increase [Lake Winnipeg’s] outflow potential by about 50%” and help “reduce overland flooding in summer.”In writing, the Churchill River Diversion and Lake Winnipeg Regulation projects sound relatively harmless.But for the Indigenous peoples whose existence and well-being are intimately connected to these waters, a reality of destruction, disorientation, and dispossession unfolded.The Churchill River’s flow was completely reversed, affecting fish migration and spawning. Fish that did survive were found to have elevated levels of mercury.Rivers and lakes people once travelled on, swam in and drank from, turned green after the flooding, their levels and currents unpredictable.Those who carried traditional knowledge of the rivers and lakes’ nature and behaviour found themselves unable to navigate the waters.Lands were flooded, including burial sites and other sacred spaces. People were uprooted from their ancestral homelands and forced to relocate to accommodate the new reservoirs.Influxes of southerners to their communities during the construction phases of dams, powerlines and other infrastructure created social problems.The Cree’s way of life was dramatically altered.A 1993 report on the NFA prepared for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples describes the “systematic degradation of the local economy,” resulting from hydro development in the region.“Many persons or households find themselves incapable of coping with economic and social disruption,” the report continues, explaining many were forced out of the traditional land-based economy and on to “welfare”.(The Jenpeg generating station near Norway House Cree Nation. Photo: Ashley Brandson/APTN)In Norway House, it was the Two- and Eight-Mile Channels that brought an influx of water into Playgreen and Little Playgreen Lakes from Lake Winnipeg.And the 115-megawatt Jenpeg dam 100 kilometres north of the community that held those waters back.Most of Norway House’s people, once members of a community at the heart of the 18th and 19th century fur trade, and in the 19th century the beneficiaries of a thriving fishery, began witnessing the end of a way of life.The Northern Flood Agreement and broken promises In 1974, as multiple dams were under construction on the Nelson River and flooding continued to devastate to Cree communities, the chiefs of five First Nations—Nelson House, Norway House, Cross Lake, York Landing and Split Lake—formed the Northern Flood Committee to negotiate compensation for their people.In 1977 they signed the Northern Flood Agreement (NFA) with Manitoba Hydro, the Government of Manitoba, and the Government of Canada.The NFA promised to compensate First Nations with reserve lands impacted by the flooding, chief among those promises “a commitment and schedule to investigate plans for alleviating mass unemployment and poverty in the communities,” says Peter Kulchyski, a professor of Native Studies at the University of Manitoba.“And Article 6 was an open-ended commitment from the federal government to ensure a continuous supply of potable water that meet the federal government’s water, health and safety standards,” he adds.Kulchyski, a co-founder of Wa Ni Ska Tan who has worked with hydro-impacted communities in northern Manitoba for more than two decades, says the NFA’s key commitments were never met.“I think [Manitoba] Hydro thought they were going to make so much money they wouldn’t know what to do with it, and they were going to throw some money at these communities and they’d be fine,” he says.But the promises proved too costly for Hydro, from a financial standpoint, Kulchyski explains.“The community needs, and also the environmental impacts, I think were far greater than they anticipated,” he says, adding the provincial utility “still touts hydro as clean power — but that’s now in absolute denial.”From Canada’s perspective, Kulchyski figures the feds were “very worried about their water commitment and the cost of that, especially when they saw that…it wasn’t going to be safe to drink the water from the river.“So suddenly supplying fresh water to the communities was an expensive proposition,” he explains.With provincial and federal governments and Manitoba Hydro largely unwilling or unable to fulfill their promises to the communities, they “went community by community, offering them various packages of some hundreds of millions of dollars,” Kulchyski continues, “if the communities would sign an agreement that said they would no longer pursue any legal action under the NFA.”Four of the five NFA Nations, excluding Cross Lake, signed what Hydro has called “implementation agreements”.Or, as Kulchyski calls them, “extinguishment agreements”.“They are basically agreements saying ‘we won’t live up to our promises under the NFA and you’ll get some money instead,’” he says.Cash compensation “never going to be enough”: councillor(A sign by the Jenpeg generating station warns of a rapidly changing water levels. Photo: Ashley Brandson/APTN)Norway House signed its implementation agreement in 1997.The $78.9 million deal compensated the community for the harms hydro had inflicted on its people.Over the past 20 years the band has used the money to build housing, a multi-use facility, and to fund programs in the community.Band councillor Langford Saunders says most of that money is now spent, though some remains invested but not generating as much interest as the band council hoped.Yet with some new infrastructure and several now-defunct programs, Saunders says the impacts of hydro development on his community continue.The beaches he grew up playing on are still gone due to the flooding.The scarcity of safe places for young people to swim or fish, coupled with fear of getting sick from the once-clean waters, is still keeping youth off the land, he says.Saunders, who was elected to council earlier this year, says he’s hopeful Hydro will work with his community to ensure the people of Norway House are compensated for the loss of their way of life.At the same time, “it’s never going to be enough,” he says.“My opinion is we can’t put a price on the loss of the activities we used to do prior to the construction of the two channels [on Playgreen Lake]. We’ve lost a lot, and there’s not enough compensation to compensate for that.”Saunders says Hydro’s “commitment to support the community has to continue.” This is Part 2 of a series on hydro-impacted communities in Treaty 5 territory. Click here to access other stories featured in Power Failure: The impacts of hydro in Northern Manitoba.Justin BrakeAshley BrandsonAPTN NewsIt was mid-December, a few years back when Chris Clarke was out on snowmobile near his brother’s camp and trapline on Playgreen Lake.He “hit an air pocket” and went through the ice into the shallow water below, he recalls.“Almost drowned that time.”His brother built a fire to warm Clarke up. The two spent hours trying to haul the brand new snowmobile out of the hole.The father and fisherman “quit trapping for a couple years,” he says.(Chris Clarke says despite his community’s settlement with Hydro, the waters are still polluted, fish populations are dwindling, and his people are struggling to hold on to their way of life. Photo: Justin Brake)But the heightened dangers associated with waterways connected to hydroelectric development weren’t enough to keep Clarke away forever.He returned to fishing and trapping, carrying on his family’s tradition and working to preserve his people’s way of life for future generations.But that way of life has been threatened since the 1970s, he explains, when Manitoba Hydro began reengineering the lakes and rivers that Cree in Treaty 5 territory have lived along, and depended on, since time immemorial.Watch Ashley Brandon’s story on the effects of hydro development on northern Manitoba. last_img read more

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No imminent First Nations policy changes says Bennett promising UNDRIPrelated cabinet directive

first_imgJustin BrakeAPTN NewsCanada won’t be introducing new comprehensive land claims and inherent rights policies just yet, Crown-Indigenous Relations Carolyn Bennett told the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Thursday.The announcement comes a day after hundreds of grassroots people, chiefs and Elders marched on an AFN policy forum to demand their involvement in any changes to federal policies impacting their rights.Demonstrators condemned a June deadline by which government previously indicated to some First Nations it wanted to have the two key policies replaced.The comprehensive claims policy applies to cases where Indigenous rights and title haven’t been addressed by treaties, while the inherent rights policy addresses the right of Indigenous peoples to govern themselves in their own communities and nations.For weeks Bennett’s office has tried to appease concerns about the deadline, saying the government “will take the time to get it right.”On Thursday Bennett reiterated that talking point, saying new policies by June are “not happening”.Instead, she announced, the Liberals will issue a cabinet directive to federal officials by the end of June, “in which we would ensure that cede and surrender and extinguishment are no longer part of the conversation as we work on the path of self-determination.”She said the directive will respect the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and that government will support a process “that is led by First Nations rights and treaty holders [to] co-develop rights-based policies that can replace the comprehensive land claims policy and inherent right policies.”Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett announced Thursday that the Liberals will issue a cabinet directive on Comprehensive Land Claims and Inherent Right Policies. Justin Brake/APTN.Bennett also said government will work with First Nations to improve the specific claims and the additions to reserve policies.More than half of the 634 First Nations are currently in dialogue or negotiations with the government, Bennett said, explaining that in ‘getting it right’ government will “uphold and affirm First Nations’ rights, title and jurisdiction.”For its review of the four key First Nations policies, the feds are engaging the AFN and First Nations Canada are currently engaged with.Others, such as member nations of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) and the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians (AIAI), say the government’s efforts to overhaul rights-based legislation and policies have fallen short of the minimum international Indigenous rights standards.Some chiefs criticized the 10 principles developed by former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould, saying the government should have asked First Nations to develop the guidelines for negotiations around legislation, policy and Indigenous rights, title and jurisdiction.Some, including many who demonstrated in Edmonton Wednesday, condemned the AFN’s role in negotiating the policy changes while the majority of those who will be impacted have little to no input.Others, still, questioned the need to engage with Canada at all, and suggested First Nations simply begin, or continue, to assert their own rights, title and jurisdiction within their communities and territories.Chief Dean Sayers of Batchewana First Nation addressed Bennett Thursday, asking rhetorically why First Nations are “asking Canada to return something that they’ve stolen?”He encouraged First Nations to “reclaim and take back what is yours — put the onus on Canada to make a specific claim to us for lands.”Bennett said that by the end of June, when the cabinet directive is issued, the existing comprehensive claims and inherent rights policies will be removed from the government’s website.jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewslast_img read more

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TD to open cybersecurity office in Tel Aviv plans to spend up

first_imgTORONTO – Toronto-Dominion Bank is opening a new office in Tel Aviv to tap Israel’s cybersecurity talent as companies of all stripes race to fortify their defences amid mounting threats.Jeff Henderson, TD’s chief information officer, says the bank plans to invest between $3 million to $5 million in its Tel Aviv office annually and aims to hire as many as 12 staff within the next year.Tel Aviv has a deep pool of cybersecurity talent coming from local universities as well as the military, he added.“The demand for cybersecurity talent is at an all time high, by everybody, and the supply in North America is limited. So it requires us to be more creative. … This is good evidence that we’re willing to go outside of our borders, outside of our market, and to open an office in order to get that talent,” he said.The cybersecurity office in Tel Aviv, which TD says is a first for a Canadian bank, comes less than a month after credit data company Equifax announced that it suffered a massive cyberattack this past summer that compromised the personal information of roughly 143 million U.S. consumers and “limited” Canadian and U.K. consumers.On Monday, Equifax revised the number of consumers potentially impacted in the breach — bumping up the total in the U.S. to 145.5 million and reducing the number in Canada from an estimated 100,000 to 8,000.For these Canadian consumers, Equifax says the information that may have been accessed includes name, address, social insurance number and, in “limited cases” credit card numbers.And as banks increasingly interact with their customers in the digital realm either online or via mobile devices rather than in physical branches, the need for strong cybersecurity becomes more pressing.“As we’re building a more digital bank, and as we’re delivering more connected and personalized experience… it introduces a premium on making sure that we’re being very careful and we are managing our risk,” said Henderson.TD has been ramping up its direct investment in cybersecurity by 30 to 35 per cent, compounded annually, each year, said Henderson, a trend he expects to continue or increase. In the last fiscal year, he estimates TD made a direct investment in cybersecurity of $150 million to $200 million.Other cities in the U.S. and Canada were also potential sites for this cybersecurity office, Henderson said.“This isn’t meant to be the only path,” he said. “This is a space around the world where demand is far outstripping supply. And it’s I think unreasonable to say we will get the best and brightest just by being centred in Toronto, or just by drawing upon the markets we have business in.”TD has already established a legal entity and has one person on the ground, said Henderson, adding the bank aims to start hiring in the next two to three weeks.“You can’t build necessarily the perfect impenetrable defence. Nobody can. But its important that your ear is to the ground, so to speak, and know what’s going on from a threat perspective. Being in Israel will give us an extra avenue.”Meanwhile, TD is spending on other technology initiatives as well.TD Bank Group is taking $3.25 million from its fin tech investment pool to provide patent application funding and expertise to startups.The bank is also bringing in artificial-intelligence powered chatbots into its mobile app. It says it has signed an agreement with Kasisto to use its KAI Banking platform, which will allow TD mobile app users to make queries about their accounts or transaction history via text chat.last_img read more

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Keystone pipeline ruling expected to help further reduce heavy oil discount

first_imgCALGARY – A regulator’s lifting of pressure restrictions on the Keystone oil pipeline in the United States earlier this week is expected to help reduce discounts being paid for Western Canadian heavy crude.Matthew John, spokesman for Calgary-based pipeline owner TransCanada Corp., says the order was limited to a small part of the pipeline following a leak in November in South Dakota and therefore the company doesn’t expect big increases in volume.He says he can’t be specific because the numbers are commercially sensitive.Still, analyst Nick Lupick of AltaCorp Capital says the decision will help reduce a glut of oil that has overwhelmed pipeline access to export markets and contributed to wider differences between bitumen-blend Western Canadian Select and West Texas Intermediate.Lupick says a bigger influence on the recent narrowing of the WCS-WTI differential to about US$17 from highs of about US$30 per barrel in the first quarter has been a series of maintenance shutdowns at oilsands producing facilities which have reduced production.The lower prices led to Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. and Cenovus Energy Inc. producing less heavy oil in the first quarter, while Husky Energy Inc. started buying heavy oil for use in its refineries because it was less expensive than producing its own oil.Companies in this story: (TSX:TRP, TSX:CNQ, TSX:CVE, TSX:HSE)last_img read more

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