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VANCOUVER FILMED HALLMARK SERIES CUTS TIES WITH LORI LOUGHLIN FOLLOWING FRAUD CHARGES

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Her former series, which was shot in Langley, was in the middle of its sixth season when Loughlin was charged earlier this week.One day before Crown Media Family’s decision, a U.S. federal court judge granted Loughlin permission to return to British Columbia to continue working on her Hallmark projects.Apart from travelling to the Vancouver area, the actor is only allowed to move within the continental U.S.Loughlin is charged with mail fraud and honest service mail fraud in the alleged bribery scheme. Authorities allege she and her husband paid US$500,000 to have their daughters labeled as crew team recruits at the University of Southern California, even though neither was a rower.Loughlin has not responded publicly to the allegations or entered a plea in the case, and didn’t speak in court Wednesday except to give one-word answers to the judge’s questions.CTV NEWS ~ With files from The Associated Press  UPDATED:  TWITTER STATEMENTS FROM HALLMARK CHANNELThe series will not air this Sunday March 17 while we are evaluating all creative options around the When Calls the Heart series. #Hearties please keep checking back to our social for all updates related to the beloved When Calls The Heart. pic.twitter.com/8sVTlJN21n— Hallmark Channel (@hallmarkchannel) March 14, 2019 Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement We are saddened by the recent news surrounding the college admissions allegations. We are no longer working with Lori Loughlin and have stopped development of all productions featuring Lori on the Crown Media Family Network channels — including #GarageSaleMysteries. pic.twitter.com/VDisz1J3SU— Hallmark Channel (@hallmarkchannel) March 14, 2019 Advertisement In this Oct. 4, 2017 photo, actress Lori Loughlin arrives at the 5th annual People Magazine “Ones To Watch” party in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File) Twitter The Hallmark Channel has announced its no longer working with Lori Loughlin in light of her arrest in the sprawling U.S. college admissions cheating case.The channel’s parent company, Crown Media Family Networks, issued a statement Thursday revealing it has stopped development of all productions involving the “Fuller House” star.Loughlin had been working on two Hallmark Channel projects filmed in Metro Vancouver, the TV series “When Calls the Heart” and the “Garage Sale Mysteries” movies.last_img read more

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We have to live with these changes everyday Norway House still struggling

first_imgAPTN News requested an interview with Manitoba Hydro for this series. They declined, but spokesperson Bruce Owen emailed a written statement.“We recognize the impact hydro-electric development has had on many Indigenous communities,” he says. “We also recognize that resolving past grievances is fundamental to strengthening our relationships with Indigenous communities.”APTN also reached out to Manitoba’s Minister of Indigenous and Northern Relations, Eileen Clarke, who declined our interview request.“Hydro has altered our way of life,” Clarke says, standing on the shore at Two-Mile Channel after showing Wa Ni Ska Tan members how Hydro re-engineered the land and waters between Playgreen Lake and Lake Winnipeg.“It’s altered everything. And what upsets me is they don’t show us proper regard or respect,” he continues.“Sure, the damage is done already, but how can we minimize it? How can we help the lake survive?“Someday I want to see my grandchildren…or my sons, continue this way of life that I’ve enjoyed.“Trapping, hunting, fishing. It’s who we are as Cree people. The lake and the land were loaned to us by the Creator for us to survive. I want people to understand that. Life is not all rosy, and we have issues to deal with, but we try our best to live.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewsabrandson@aptn.ca@ashleybrandson “We have to live with these changes every day…”Clarke is president of the Norway House Fisherman’s Cooperative, which represents 50 local fishers who work in a struggling industry harvesting fish from Playgreen Lake, Lake Winnipeg and Kiskittogisu Lake.Today he’s taking Wa Ni Ska Tan alliance members out in boat to show them the impacts hydro development has had on the waters and fisheries.The boat weaves through a channel, a few kilometres outside of Norway House, with cabins and homes scattered along the shore.A crane towers above the tall grasses along the banks and watches the boat pass by.Minutes later the channel opens up, revealing beams of sunlight glimmering on Playgreen Lake’s pale green waters. There is slight wind.The boat passes dozens of islands, some of them new, some reduced to the bedrock that once sat below their soil and vegetation, and others completely submerged underwater.All of the islands have eroded as a result of fluctuating water levels controlled by Manitoba Hydro; they’re a danger to fishermen and others who use the lake, Clarke explains.(The Norway House Fisherman’s Co-op, established in 1962, represents 50 commercial fishers from the Norway House area. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)A 20-minute boat ride takes the alliance members—there to witness and document the impacts of hydro development on local people and communities—to a small plant owned by the Fisherman’s Co-op.It’s here the fishermen land their catches of whitefish, pickerel and sauger and package it for transportation by truck 800 kilometres to Winnipeg, where the fish is further processed and marketed.Standing on the dock and peering out at the lake, Clarke says the co-op’s fishers are working with a significantly reduced quota and often struggle to make ends meet.“The silting is killing this lake because it’s killing the oxygen: the plant life, the fish — the fish can’t spawn here anymore.”(Lands were blasted and excavated to create Two-Mile Channel, which connects Playgreen Lake to Lake Winnipeg. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)He says sturgeon—culturally significant to the Cree but now listed as an endangered species—were once plentiful in the lake but have almost entirely disappeared since the wave of hydro development in the region four decades ago.Clarke says trees are constantly falling into the lake due to the shoreline erosion, and that they pose a safety risk to fishermen.As in other hydro-impacted communities, Manitoba Hydro pays locals from Norway House to retrieve trees and other debris in order to reduce the safety risk, he explains.Fluctuating water levels also create air pockets beneath the ice in wintertime, like the one Clarke fell through a few years ago.Some have given up fishing altogether, he says.“We have to live with these changes everyday. Day in, day out, while we’re out here trying to make a living, providing for our families.”Dispossessed by hydroIn the 1960s, Manitoba and the federal government jointly explored the hydro potential of the Nelson River as a source of power for the growing energy needs in the south.The Nelson drains into Lake Winnipeg and runs more than 600 kilometres to Hudson Bay.With a drainage basin that spans more than 1 million square kilometres across multiple provinces, it’s also an important waterway for the Cree, Metis and other Indigenous peoples in the region.But by the 1970s, Manitoba Hydro had turned the river, its tributaries, and other waterways in the region into energy-and-profit-producing entities.According to Hydro’s website, The Churchill River Diversion (CRD) “was created to increase the water flow to our large generating stations on the lower Nelson River”, with most of the Churchill’s flow “diverted at Southern Indian Lake into the Nelson River.”Hydro describes a network of dams and channels that control the river’s flow into South Indian Lake and Split Lake, with the outcome being an average of “25% more water [flowing] into the Nelson River system.”At the same time, as it was re-engineering the Churchill River system, Hydro also undertook the Lake Winnipeg Regulation (LWR), another massive engineering feat that “created a second outlet for Lake Winnipeg and a network of channels and structures,” according to Hydro’s website.Hydro boasts that the Jenpeg dam and a series of diversion channels “increase [Lake Winnipeg’s] outflow potential by about 50%” and help “reduce overland flooding in summer.”In writing, the Churchill River Diversion and Lake Winnipeg Regulation projects sound relatively harmless.But for the Indigenous peoples whose existence and well-being are intimately connected to these waters, a reality of destruction, disorientation, and dispossession unfolded.The Churchill River’s flow was completely reversed, affecting fish migration and spawning. Fish that did survive were found to have elevated levels of mercury.Rivers and lakes people once travelled on, swam in and drank from, turned green after the flooding, their levels and currents unpredictable.Those who carried traditional knowledge of the rivers and lakes’ nature and behaviour found themselves unable to navigate the waters.Lands were flooded, including burial sites and other sacred spaces. People were uprooted from their ancestral homelands and forced to relocate to accommodate the new reservoirs.Influxes of southerners to their communities during the construction phases of dams, powerlines and other infrastructure created social problems.The Cree’s way of life was dramatically altered.A 1993 report on the NFA prepared for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples describes the “systematic degradation of the local economy,” resulting from hydro development in the region.“Many persons or households find themselves incapable of coping with economic and social disruption,” the report continues, explaining many were forced out of the traditional land-based economy and on to “welfare”.(The Jenpeg generating station near Norway House Cree Nation. Photo: Ashley Brandson/APTN)In Norway House, it was the Two- and Eight-Mile Channels that brought an influx of water into Playgreen and Little Playgreen Lakes from Lake Winnipeg.And the 115-megawatt Jenpeg dam 100 kilometres north of the community that held those waters back.Most of Norway House’s people, once members of a community at the heart of the 18th and 19th century fur trade, and in the 19th century the beneficiaries of a thriving fishery, began witnessing the end of a way of life.The Northern Flood Agreement and broken promises In 1974, as multiple dams were under construction on the Nelson River and flooding continued to devastate to Cree communities, the chiefs of five First Nations—Nelson House, Norway House, Cross Lake, York Landing and Split Lake—formed the Northern Flood Committee to negotiate compensation for their people.In 1977 they signed the Northern Flood Agreement (NFA) with Manitoba Hydro, the Government of Manitoba, and the Government of Canada.The NFA promised to compensate First Nations with reserve lands impacted by the flooding, chief among those promises “a commitment and schedule to investigate plans for alleviating mass unemployment and poverty in the communities,” says Peter Kulchyski, a professor of Native Studies at the University of Manitoba.“And Article 6 was an open-ended commitment from the federal government to ensure a continuous supply of potable water that meet the federal government’s water, health and safety standards,” he adds.Kulchyski, a co-founder of Wa Ni Ska Tan who has worked with hydro-impacted communities in northern Manitoba for more than two decades, says the NFA’s key commitments were never met.“I think [Manitoba] Hydro thought they were going to make so much money they wouldn’t know what to do with it, and they were going to throw some money at these communities and they’d be fine,” he says.But the promises proved too costly for Hydro, from a financial standpoint, Kulchyski explains.“The community needs, and also the environmental impacts, I think were far greater than they anticipated,” he says, adding the provincial utility “still touts hydro as clean power — but that’s now in absolute denial.”From Canada’s perspective, Kulchyski figures the feds were “very worried about their water commitment and the cost of that, especially when they saw that…it wasn’t going to be safe to drink the water from the river.“So suddenly supplying fresh water to the communities was an expensive proposition,” he explains.With provincial and federal governments and Manitoba Hydro largely unwilling or unable to fulfill their promises to the communities, they “went community by community, offering them various packages of some hundreds of millions of dollars,” Kulchyski continues, “if the communities would sign an agreement that said they would no longer pursue any legal action under the NFA.”Four of the five NFA Nations, excluding Cross Lake, signed what Hydro has called “implementation agreements”.Or, as Kulchyski calls them, “extinguishment agreements”.“They are basically agreements saying ‘we won’t live up to our promises under the NFA and you’ll get some money instead,’” he says.Cash compensation “never going to be enough”: councillor(A sign by the Jenpeg generating station warns of a rapidly changing water levels. Photo: Ashley Brandson/APTN)Norway House signed its implementation agreement in 1997.The $78.9 million deal compensated the community for the harms hydro had inflicted on its people.Over the past 20 years the band has used the money to build housing, a multi-use facility, and to fund programs in the community.Band councillor Langford Saunders says most of that money is now spent, though some remains invested but not generating as much interest as the band council hoped.Yet with some new infrastructure and several now-defunct programs, Saunders says the impacts of hydro development on his community continue.The beaches he grew up playing on are still gone due to the flooding.The scarcity of safe places for young people to swim or fish, coupled with fear of getting sick from the once-clean waters, is still keeping youth off the land, he says.Saunders, who was elected to council earlier this year, says he’s hopeful Hydro will work with his community to ensure the people of Norway House are compensated for the loss of their way of life.At the same time, “it’s never going to be enough,” he says.“My opinion is we can’t put a price on the loss of the activities we used to do prior to the construction of the two channels [on Playgreen Lake]. We’ve lost a lot, and there’s not enough compensation to compensate for that.”Saunders says Hydro’s “commitment to support the community has to continue.” This is Part 2 of a series on hydro-impacted communities in Treaty 5 territory. Click here to access other stories featured in Power Failure: The impacts of hydro in Northern Manitoba.Justin BrakeAshley BrandsonAPTN NewsIt was mid-December, a few years back when Chris Clarke was out on snowmobile near his brother’s camp and trapline on Playgreen Lake.He “hit an air pocket” and went through the ice into the shallow water below, he recalls.“Almost drowned that time.”His brother built a fire to warm Clarke up. The two spent hours trying to haul the brand new snowmobile out of the hole.The father and fisherman “quit trapping for a couple years,” he says.(Chris Clarke says despite his community’s settlement with Hydro, the waters are still polluted, fish populations are dwindling, and his people are struggling to hold on to their way of life. Photo: Justin Brake)But the heightened dangers associated with waterways connected to hydroelectric development weren’t enough to keep Clarke away forever.He returned to fishing and trapping, carrying on his family’s tradition and working to preserve his people’s way of life for future generations.But that way of life has been threatened since the 1970s, he explains, when Manitoba Hydro began reengineering the lakes and rivers that Cree in Treaty 5 territory have lived along, and depended on, since time immemorial.Watch Ashley Brandon’s story on the effects of hydro development on northern Manitoba. last_img read more

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Vandalism act a black spot in Indian history

first_imgKolkata: The syndicate of Calcutta University on Thursday condemned the destruction of the bust of Pandit Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar on May 14 on the premises of Vidyasagar College, which is affiliated to the varsity.Reading out the resolution for condemnation, the Vice-Chancellor of the Calcutta University Sonali Chakravarti Banerjee said: “The destruction of Vidyasagar’s bust is a black spot in Indian history and the university community denounces this attack on our heritage.” She further said the Vidyasagar College authorities had informed the university about the incident and the varsity had assured the college of all possible assistance to reconstruct of the bust of the great social reformer. Vice-Chancellors of state universities have expressed deep concern over the vandalism and wrecking of the bust of Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar at the Vidyasagar College. The statement jointly issued by the Vice-Chancellors asserts that such incidents were destroying the sanctity of educational institutions and striking at the root of Bengal’s eclectic cultural past. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja”We express deep concern regarding the vandalism that was perpetrated on educational institutions in Kolkata and the wrecking of the bust of Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar on the premises of Vidyasagar College on Tuesday evening,” read the statement. “Vidyasagar symbolised the spirit of the Bengal Renaissance and pioneered the movement for the spread of education and women’s empowerment.” The Vice-Chancellors urged that in the name of politics people should not tarnish the heritage of Bengal.last_img read more

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Moroccan Professor Released From Humiliating Detention in Belgium

By Safaa Kasraoui and Sana ElouaziRabat – After spending three days in the Steenokkerzeel detention center in Belgium for allegedly not having enough money to finance his stay in the country, Moroccan professor Abdelkader Hakkou was released on Sunday.  On Friday, Hakkou headed to Belgium after he received an invitation from the Free University of Brussels (ULB) in order to take part in an inter-university mission for a development cooperation project on the sustainable management of palm and date palm cultivation. After landing at Charleroi airport on Friday, Hakko was prevented from leaving the airport by the Belgian authorities, who then detained him in the closed center of Steenokkerzeel, a Dutch-speaking Belgian municipality in the Flemish Region.Authorities said that Hakkou’s papers were not in order, and that there was a refoulement procedure in place. Authorities claimed that Hakkou, who is also vice-president of Oujda’s Mohammed I University, could not afford to finance his stay in the country and thus did not fulfill the conditions for entering in Belgium.Humiliation After his release, the professor strongly condemned his detention, saying that he was “humiliated.”“I stayed all night on a metal chair, it is humiliating. It is hard to accept,” the professor told the press.Hakkou added that he was surprised by the way he was received by the airport authorities while his ULB colleagues were waiting just outside. “What a spiral of events I lived these two and a half days! It is a shame for a democratic country that respects human rights,” reported Maghreb Arab Press (MAP).ULB Responds to Airport AuthoritiesThe arrest shocked not only Hakkou but also the university, who strongly denounced his arrest Nicolas Dassonville, spokesperson of the university, said after his arrest was reported that “it is absolutely absurd that he is in detention. This is not the first time he has been to Belgium or Europe. It is very surprising that this is happening.”The university spokesperson affirmed then that the professor is on an official trip in the country. ”We will ensure that the professor will be released as soon as possible, because we have all the documents that prove that he is on the Belgian territory for a development cooperation project for which it is financed.”At the time, one of the professors has already visited the closed center of Steenokkerzeel to bring documents proving Professor Hakkou’s cooperation mission.  ULB explained that it had “appointed a lawyer to get him out of the closed center as quickly as possible,” a procedure that led to his release on Sunday.For Yvon Englert, rector of the ULB “[Belgium] needs to open to up to the world. We especially need the university to have serene collaborations with all countries, including those from the south, and I would like to remind you that this professor is here in the context of a collaboration financed by public money, which makes the situation even more surreal.”The university rector believes that “Belgium is going the wrong way. We must stop running behind the extreme right. This is not the right track.” read more

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Gunman at Marylands Capital Gazette Charged with 5 Counts of FirstDegree

By Chase LacyRabat – Friday five charges of first-degree murder were filed against Capital Gazette shooter Jarrod Warren Ramos. The gunman’s bail hearing was set at 10:30 a.m. in Annapolis, Maryland. On Thursday, June 28, the gunman stormed into the office of the Annapolis-based newspaper and opened fire on the staff. The gunman shot through the glass door and, according to Anne Arundel County Police Chief William Krampf, “He entered the building with a shotgun and he located his victims as he walked through the lower level.” Staff in the small office began scrambling and hiding under their desks, hoping that the gunman would not cross their path. Staff members noted when they could hear his footsteps wandering around, the blasts of his shotgun, and when he reloaded. Staff reported that the police reaction was swift, responding to an emergency call in less than two minutes. Police entered the building and, without an exchange of gunfire, apprehended the gunman hiding underneath a desk with his gun lying beside him. Approximately 170 people evacuated the multi-office building with their hands in the air. Victims of the attack were editorial page editor Gerald Fischman, assistant editor Rob Hiaasen, reporter John McNamara, sales assistant Rebecca Smith, and features writer Wendi Winters. Two other staff members sustained non-life threatening injuries and were released from the hospital. The shooter had a tumultuous history with the Capital Gazette, filing a defamation lawsuit against the paper in 2012 because of an article written by Eric Hartley. The shooter claimed he was harmed by the article, which described his guilty conviction for criminal harassment of a woman online. The case was dismissed in 2013, and the ruling was upheld in 2015.Police reported that the suspect was not cooperative and that identifying him was difficult. They reported that he had no identification on his person and his fingerprints had been “altered.” The police reportedly used facial recognition software to identify the 39-year-old from Laurel, Maryland. The last case of journalists shot and killed came in August 2015, when Vester Lee Flanagan II killed television reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward during a live broadcast in Roanoke, Virginia. The case is one among a multitude of shootings every year in the United States, and adds fuel to the ongoing bitterly divisive political debate amongst Americans regarding gun control. read more

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UN humanitarian chief to lead inspection mission into Darfur Sudan next week

A UN spokesperson told reporters today that Jan Egeland, UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, will visit Greater Darfur’s three regions – northern, western and southern – to examine issues of protection, possible gaps in humanitarian assistance and ways to increase relief and funding.UN agencies estimate that at least 700,000 people have become internally displaced within Darfur since fighting erupted there early last year between the Sudanese Government, allied militias and rebel groups. Another 110,000 refugees have fled into neighbouring Chad.Early this month, after briefing the Security Council, Mr. Egeland told the press that the Janjaweed, identified by reports as Arab militia and allied to Khartoum, was mainly responsible for the forced depopulation of whole areas of Darfur. He said UN staff had received credible and frequent reports of murders, rapes and acts of looting, and the victims were largely the Fur, Zaghawas and Massalit ethnic communities.On Friday the UN announced it was seeking $115 million in donations from the international community to help the people of Darfur cope with the effects of the civil conflict, a five-fold increase from a September appeal.Next week’s humanitarian mission has been arranged at the request of the Sudanese Government, spokesperson Marie Okabe said, and follows last week’s signing by Khartoum and the rebel groups of a ceasefire in Darfur. The mission will include representatives from several UN humanitarian agencies, as well as members of the Sudanese Government.A separate fact-finding mission, organized the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), remains in the Sudanese-Chadian border area interviewing refugees. That mission is still waiting for authorization to travel into Darfur. read more

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UN seeks to ease Bangladeshs worsening flood crisis

With more than 23 million people in Bangladesh affected by devastating floods that could yet worsen after already killing at least 275 people and damaging or destroying over 12 million houses, United Nations agencies are rushing in aid ranging from essential medicines to food to water purification tablets.Flooding has also hit the neighbouring Indian state of Assam, affecting nearly 10,500 villages with a total population of more than 12 million people, killing more than 180 people and rendering millions homeless.A new Operations Coordination Room has been set up to consolidate all assessments on the ground in Bangladesh under the Disaster and Emergency Response area of the south Asian country’s Local Consultative Group, which includes such bodies as the UN and the World Bank.Nearly 1 million people have been forced to move into shelters and the situation is still worsening in the capital, Dhaka, where water from several river basins is continuing to flow in. Some 2 million acres of crops has also been damaged or destroyed in Bangladesh.UN agencies involved in aid operations include the World Health Organization (WHO), which is providing essential drugs and medical supplies and the World Food Programme (WFP), which, with its partners, has been distributing high energy biscuits, rice and polypropylene bags.The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has pledged a further $100,000 for nutrition, sanitation, health and water-related needs and has also donated water purification tablets, temporary sanitary facilities and food for young children.The forecast for the country of 124 million people remains one of prolonged flooding, with possible recurrences towards the end of August. The Government continues to welcome any international assistance provided by the UN and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported. read more

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UN expert Ecuadors indigenous people lack adequate access to social services

Just back from a 10-day visit to Ecuador, during which he met a wide cross-section of society, including the President and other officials, donors, UN representatives and indigenous peoples and their leaders, Rodolfo Stavenhagen, the Special Rapporteur on the human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, also drew attention to the increasing emigration from indigenous communities due to the lack of employment.“The information obtained indicates that the indigenous peoples lack adequate access to basic social services such as education and health,” he said, voicing particular concern about maternal and infant mortality rates and the absence of health services, especially in rural areas.“The lack of regulations regarding indigenous justice is giving rise to conflictive situations related to jurisdictional disputes and to possible violations of the right to life and physical integrity,” he said, pointing out that these problems are being aggravated by the lack of an adequate public defence system.”The Special Rapporteur visited various communities including Sarayaku, which is involved in a conflict related to oil exploration and exploitation and he called attention to how some economic activity is adversely affecting indigenous peoples.“Of particular concern are the progressive deterioration of indigenous habitat and the impact of extractive activities (hydro-carbon, mining and logging) on the environment and the rights of indigenous peoples,” he noted, adding he had received “serious claims” regarding this situation in the Amazonian region as well as other areas of Ecuador.“Special attention should be paid to the growing problems of the people confronting illegal logging and other activities in their territories, who have not been contacted,” he said.Special Rapporteurs are unpaid experts serving in an independent personal capacity who received their mandate from the now defunct UN Commission on Human Rights and will now report to the newly established and enhanced Human Rights Council. read more

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Annan visits war crimes court in Sierra Leone

On the second stage of an African and European trip, Mr. Annan visited Camp Solar, which houses the more than 200 Mongolian soldiers who protect the UN-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone, where those charged with crimes against humanity are being tried for their roles in the 10-year conflict in which thousands were killed and many others mutilated with amputations of limbs. He thanked them for their dedicated, exemplary service so far from their home, adding that they could be the vanguard of increased Mongolian participation in UN peacekeeping.The Secretary-General assured President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah that while the peacekeeping mission had closed, the UN remained dedicated to working in Sierra Leone and stands ready to assist in elections.Speaking to reporters after meeting the president, Mr. Annan praised progress in Sierra Leone. “There have been some remarkable achievements: the security situation has remained stable; commercial activity has expanded; the economy is growing, albeit from a low base; there has been progress in fostering national reconciliation; the country now has a professional police force; the restructuring of the army continues; you are preparing to go to national elections next year. At the same time, he noted that Sierra Leone is beset by a number of difficulties, including “limited employment opportunities, especially for the youth; lack of capacity in many State institutions; extreme poverty and the fragile security situation in the sub-region.” The UN Integrated Office in Sierra Leone was created to support the Government in consolidating the gains already made and in addressing remaining challenges, he added.He then went to see the Special Court, where he was briefed by senior officials on its work and its completion strategy. The Special Court will have jurisdiction over the case against former Liberian President Charles Taylor at The Hague. Speaking to reporters, Mr. Annan said that trial would be a signal event. “Mr. Taylor’s trial should send the strong message around the continent, and around the world, that warlords in other parts of Africa, and the world, can not assume that they will get away with their crimes, and that impunity will not be allowed to stand.”Mr. Annan, who arrived in Sierra Leone from the Gambian capital of Banjul where he attended an African Union summit, was leaving for Liberia. After that, he will head on to Côte d’Ivoire, where he expects on Wednesday to continue discussions on resolving the crisis that has divided the country between a Government-held south and a rebel-held north. In New York, a UN spokesman announced that Mr. Annan has added Italy and Russia to the European part of his trip which already includes talks in Berlin with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Horst Kohler. In Russia he will attend the summit of the Group of 8 (G-8) industrialized countries in St. Petersburg. read more

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BC Liberals to table balanced budget NDP has doubts

by Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press Posted Feb 17, 2013 3:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email B.C. Liberals to table balanced budget, NDP has doubts VICTORIA – Finance Minister Mike de Jong is set to deliver what he’s calling a pre-election balanced budget Tuesday _ complete with a seal of approval from a noted economist _ but the Opposition New Democrats say British Columbians won’t buy it.The delivery of what de Jong is calling a balanced budget makes good on the Liberal government’s promise to get British Columbia out of the red after four consecutive deficit budgets in time for the fast-approaching May 14 provincial election.But de Jong said it wasn’t easy balancing the books, which means the budget won’t be bursting with election goodies to entice voters.“To reconfirm, the budget will be balanced,” he said last week. “Getting there is not easy. This will not be a traditional pre-election budget where governments are doling out promises in the billions of dollars. The money simply isn’t there.”A Liberal government source who spoke on condition of anonymity said the government will go to great lengths to show exactly how Tuesday’s budget is balanced.The source said the budget includes economic forecasts of modest surpluses over the next three years.The source said former Bank of Montreal chief economist Tim O’Neill has examined the government’s revenue projections in the budget and will confirm the numbers are on track.The Liberals are expected to release O’Neill’s report on Monday.Opposition finance critic Bruce Ralston said the findings of a hired hand and the government’s tabling of what it says is a balanced budget likely won’t be enough to convince British Columbians.He said most British Columbians have yet to forget former premier Gordon Campbell’s promise during the 2009 election campaign that the budget’s deficit was a maximum of $495 million, but ended up near $2 billion after the campaign in which the Liberals won their third consecutive mandate.“They face intense public skepticism on their record that they deceived the public in 2009, so I think people will approach whatever the finance minister says with a real lack of confidence,” said Ralston.He said the New Democrats will be scouring the budget documents to watch if the government continues its previous practice of placing hundreds of millions of dollars in dividend earnings from BC Hydro into general revenue.Recent Hydro budget numbers included in the Crown corporation’s environmental impact statement for Hydro’s proposed Site C dam project suggest losses of about $1 billion over the next four years, Ralston said.The New Democrats will also be looking for more details on the government’s proposed sale of asset properties that were highlighted in last year’s budget, he said.The Liberals said they had targeted sales of up to $700 million in asset properties, but have provided few details on the properties except for the Vancouver area Little Mountain property worth about $290 million.“On asset sales, you have to be cautious to not count your chickens before they hatch,” Ralston said.The government source said the budget will not raise the corporate capital tax, bank tax or the carbon tax. The agriculture sector will get a carbon tax break, but the source would not elaborate.The source did not discuss comments made last year by former finance minister Kevin Falcon that the government would consider raising corporate income taxes to 11 per cent from 10 per cent in 2014 if the financial situation doesn’t improve.The New Democrats say they will raise corporate income taxes to 12 per cent if elected in May.De Jong said one of the major reasons he’s able to table a balanced budget on Tuesday is because of the contract settlements the government reached with its public service workers.Pay increases were held to bare minimums under the government’s negotiating mandates of net zero and co-operative gains.“If, for example, in those years where the settlements had been for zero, it had been very modest settlements of two and two per cent, we’d be billions of dollars under water now,” said de Jong. “We wouldn’t be having any kind of conversation about a balanced budget.”Last week’s throne speech highlighted the Liberal government’s proposed B.C. Prosperity Fund, which proposes to eliminate the debt and provincial sales tax with revenues and royalties from the province’s expected lucrative returns from the export of liquefied natural gas to Asia.But so far, none of the proposed LNG plants, which the province forecasts could earn up to $1 trillion over the next 30 years, are in operation.Premier Christy Clark said the Prosperity Fund could accumulate between $130 billion and $260 billion for the government, but it won’t start earning money until the LNG plants start operating.The Liberal government’s jobs plan forecasts one LNG plant in northwest B.C. in operation by 2015 and two others running by 2020. The government has recently said interest in LNG has increased and there’s a possibility of five plants in operation by the end of the decade.Exporting LNG involves extracting natural gas from northeast B.C., shipping it in pipelines to Kitimat and the Prince Rupert area, where the gas is cooled and placed on tankers headed for Asia. read more

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UN mission welcomes return of renowned doctor to eastern DR Congo following

Dr. Mukwege, the founder and Director-General of the Panzi Hospital in Bukavu in South Kivu province, was attacked in his home by armed men who shot and killed his security guard. He and his family were not hurt in the attack.Roger Meece, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative and head of the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO), said Dr. Mukwege’s “courageous” decision to return after he was attacked demonstrates his “infallible commitment and dedication” to women who have suffered sexual abuse. Mr. Meece also reiterated the hope that more light will be shed on the attack and that the perpetrators will be brought to justice, the mission added in a news release. MONUSCO supported local government officials and the national Congolese police force in South Kivu to ensure the safe return of Dr. Mukwege and will continue, within the limits of its mandate, to provide him with all the assistance he needs to pursue his important work.Dr. Mukwege’s efforts to help victims of sexual violence also include serving on a special high-level panel appointed by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, which produced a report in 2011 highlighting the deprivations endured by thousands of victims of sexual violence in the DRC, including the lack of access to medical and psychological treatment, amongst others. read more

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Nvidia to update Tegra 2 with 3D output speed bump to 12GHz

first_imgWe already know that the current Tegra 2 is fast with the benchmarks that we reported last week showcasing its merits. Well it seems that Nvidia is set to update the mobile CPU, which will be officially announced next month, with a couple of enhancements.The first is that the CPU will be boosted from its current 1GHz clock speed to 1.2Ghz and that it will have 3D-output support. Two versions will also be produced: one for phones and the other for tablets (AP25 and T25 respectively).Apparently LG may be the first company to use the new processor in its upcoming G-Slate. That kind of makes sense given that the latter is likely to feature a glasses-free 3D display and its dual cameras at the back can record stereoscopic 3D.The AP25 and T25 are said to arrive in the spring of this year, but Nvidia is expected to showcase the new CPU at the upcoming Mobile World Congress in February. We suspect that this will be the time when LG reveal their G-Slate formally.Read more at Electronistalast_img read more

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Icelands plan to ban circumcision is causing controversy

first_imgIceland’s plan to ban circumcision is causing controversy Lawmakers want it put on par with female genital mutilation. Short URL 31,493 Views Share27 Tweet Email2 Sunday 25 Feb 2018, 9:00 PM 92 Comments Feb 25th 2018, 9:01 PM By Associated Press ICELANDIC LAWMAKERS ARE considering a law that would ban the circumcision of boys for non-medical reasons, making it the first European country to do so.Some religious leaders in Iceland and across Europe have called the bill an attack on religious freedom. It is seen as a particular threat by Jews and Muslims who traditionally embrace the practice.Under the proposed law, the circumcision of boys — removing the foreskin of the penis, usually when the child is a newborn — would be viewed as equal to female genital mutilation and punishable by up to six years in prison.“This is fundamentally about not causing unnecessary harm to a child,” said Silja Dogg Gunnarsdottir, lawmaker for the centrist Progressive Party, who introduced the bill this month.The proposed law calls circumcision a violation of human rights “since boys are not able to give an informed consent of an irreversible physical intervention.”Circumcision is not common in Iceland, a small Atlantic Ocean island nation of 340,000 people that is overwhelmingly Lutheran or atheist, with an estimated 100 to 200 Jews and about 1,100 practicing Muslims.The bill has eight co-sponsors but is considered unlikely to get a majority in the 63-seat Iceland parliament. It does not have the formal backing of any government ministers but has drawn the support of 422 Icelandic doctors who favor outlawing the 4,000-year-old religious practice.They issued a joint statement Wednesday saying circumcision violates the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and also the physicians’ Hippocratic Oath that says: “First, do no harm.”“In Western societies, circumcision of healthy boys has no significant health benefits,” the doctors’ statement read, citing a 2013 paper in the American Academy of Pediatrics journal.The American academy itself says the health benefits of the practice outweigh the risks but not by enough to recommend universal male circumcision. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says doctors should educate infant boys’ parents about the health benefits of circumcision, which it says reduces the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. Imam Salmann Tamimi addresses the congregation at The Reykjavík Mosque during Friday midday prayers. He warned his multinational congregation about the proposed ban on circumcision of boys for non-medical reasons. Source: Egill BjarnasonPhysician Eyjolfur Thorkelsson said the 422 signatures (a quarter of the country’s practicing physicians, based on numbers from the Icelandic Medical Association) were collected in just 48 hours.Since 2006, only 21 boys under the age of 18 have been circumcised at Icelandic hospitals or private clinics, according to Iceland’s Directorate of Health. The agency could not say how many were for religious reasons.Thorkelsson said the surgical procedure is painful, and its possible complications are well known to Icelandic doctors since most go abroad for training at hospitals in northern Europe or the United States where circumcision is more common.“For many doctors, it’s an uncomfortable request from parents,” he said.This view is not accepted in Jewish and Muslim communities. During Friday services at a prayer space above a home goods store, Imam Salmann Tamimi warned his multinational congregation about the proposed law.“Circumcision is harmless if it’s done at a hospital,” he said. “This bill is appealing to people’s emotion, not evidence.”He said circumcision was important to Muslims but even more so to Jews.“This is an attack on all religion and especially Judaism,” he said.Core practiceRabbi Avi Feldman of the Chabad Jewish Center, who last month became Iceland’s first permanent rabbi since World War II, says he hopes the bill does not become law. In a statement to the AP, he said circumcision is a core Jewish practice that serves as a bedrock of Jewish life.He was hopeful that the “rights for people of all faiths will be preserved and respected.”Parliament is to continue the first reading of the bill in the next week.Legislator Gunnarsdottir said many male “victims” of circumcision had reached out to share their stories and seek support since she introduced the bill.“It’s important for us as a society to discuss this,” she said. “The experience of many men who have had this done to their body without consent confirms that.” http://jrnl.ie/3871108 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Veteran British actor and Game of Thrones star Peter Vaughan dies aged

first_img 20 Comments 16,349 Views http://jrnl.ie/3124213 Peter Vaughan as Maester Aemon in the hit show. Source: HBO.comBRITISH ACTOR PETER Vaughan, best known for his role as Maester Aemon in hit television series Game of Thrones, has died at the age of 93.The character actor had been a recognisable figure on British television screens since the 1950s, but his appearance in the fantasy epic over five years from 2011 won him global fans.“Very sadly Peter Vaughan passed away at approximately 10.30 this morning. He died peacefully with his family around him,” his agent Sally Long-Innes said.Partially sighted in real life, in Game of Thrones he played the blind maester of Castle Black, one of the lord commander’s closest advisors in the Night’s Watch. Source: BBCWorldwide/YouTubeVaughan also appeared as the villain Harry Grout in prison sitcom Porridge in the 1970s, and starred in Our Friends in the North in the 1990s, for which he was nominated for a BAFTA television award.Born on 4 April, 1923, he was married to actress Billie Whitelaw for 12 years. He is survived by his second wife, actress Lillias Walker.© – AFP 2016 with reporting by Rónán Duffy Read: Fawlty Towers actor Andrew Sachs dies at age of 86 >Read: Fidel Castro has died at the age of 90 > Tuesday 6 Dec 2016, 8:10 PM Dec 6th 2016, 8:10 PM Share305 Tweet Email By AFP Veteran British actor and Game of Thrones star Peter Vaughan dies aged 93 The actor is also known for his role in prison comedy Porridge. Short URL Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Golden Dawn linked to firebombs

first_imgA 22-year-old man who was arrested in Volos, central Greece, earlier this month carrying a load of Molotov cocktails has allegedly told police that he was intending to firebomb a makeshift mosque following instructions from members of neofascist Golden Dawn, who had provided him with paid work. Kathimerini understands that the suspect, known by the initials ZM, told police that he carried out tasks for the party in return for occasional work. “He did some farming work that was assigned to him by Golden Dawn,” the suspect’s lawyer, Dimitris Gouvas, told Kathimerini. “This helped him secure a few days’ wages, which he needed to look after his family. He is married and has a 14-month-old child.” When contacted by Kathimerini, the local branch of the party denied any connection to the suspect. The 22-year-old told police that two other men arrested when his car was stopped did not know he was carrying the petrol bombs. However, a search of the suspects’ homes revealed various Golden Dawn literature, two knives and balaclavas. Kathimerini understands that the three men had been under observation by the police when they were arrested but it was only later that the 22-year-old revealed they were intending to attack a makeshift mosque in Volos. In a related development, an internal investigation has been launched into claims that a 22-year-old police cadet threatened students at the Democritus University of Thrace, telling Muslims they should leave the building as he was a Golden Dawn member. Source: Kathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Le lapin Duracell en tournée pour encourager le recyclage des piles

Le lapin Duracell en tournée pour encourager le recyclage des pilesDès le 21 mars, le fabricant Duracell lancera une campagne de sensibilisation nationale pour encourager les Français à recycler leurs piles. La tournée passera par quatre grandes villes de France : Lille, Paris, Lyon, Marseille. Sur le milliard de piles vendues chaque année en France, seules 36% d’entre elles sont recyclées quand les autres finissent à la poubelle. Pourtant, le recyclage permet de réutiliser environ 50% d’une pile et de lui donner une seconde vie. Elle se voit alors transformée en toits, en gouttières (moyennant 350 piles pour une gouttière en zinc), en robinets (125 piles), en couverts (1 fourchette pour 10 piles) voire en casseroles (75 piles). Mais elles peuvent aussi servir à fabriquer des matériaux de construction de route ou plots de circulation.À lire aussiInterview : Voilà pourquoi l’espérance de vie des Français et des Françaises ne progresse pasPour cela, encore faut-il déposer les piles dans les collecteurs prévus à cet effet qui leur assureront un voyage direct vers le centre de recyclage. Un geste qui se fait encore trop rare selon le fabricant Duracell qui a donc décidé de lancer une vaste campagne nationale de sensibilisation sur le sujet avec sa célébrissime icône : le lapin Duracell. Du 21 au 31 mars, le fabricant invite ainsi le grand public à rapporter ses piles et petites batteries rechargeables usagées sur son stand et à s’informer sur le recyclage d’une pile. Au total, la tournée fera quatre haltes : le 21 mars à Lille, place Richebé; le 24 mars à Paris, au Parc de la Villette ; le 28 mars à Lyon, place Antoine Jutard et le 31 mars à Marseille, au Centre Commercial La Valentine.En plus de rapporter les piles usagées, le public pourra aussi participer en famille à des ateliers pédagogiques et des animations originales, en présence du lapin Duracell. Ceux-ci permettront de comprendre tout en s’amusant le parcours de recyclage d’une pile grâce à des jeux de mémoire, quiz et concours. Ajouté à cela, “dans chaque ville, une famille aura la possibilité de gagner, après un tirage au sort, un week-end ‘nature’ pour 4 personnes. Pour participer à ce concours, il suffit de venir déposer ses piles usagées dans le bus Duracell, spécialement conçu pour l’opération et de s’enregistrer sur une borne digitale”, explique Duracell dans un communiqué. Par ailleurs, afin de créer une véritable mobilisation autour du recyclage des piles, Duracell, soutiendra financièrement, dans le cadre du programme Environnement de la Fondation de France, le projet d’une association locale engagée dans des actions éco-citoyennes dans la région de la ville qui aura récolté le plus de piles. Le 14 mars 2012 à 15:41 • Maxime Lambert read more

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Chiesa Im only concerned with proving my value at Fiorentina

first_imgReports of a big-money move are of no concern to Federico Chiesa, who is more interested in proving himself at FiorentinaThe 20-year-old midfielder’s impressive displays at Florence has attracted the interest of Serie A giants Juventus, Napoli and Inter Milan for a reported €60m deal.Yet Chiesa feels that figure has been exaggerated and will instead continue to focus on giving his all for Fiorentina ahead of Sunday’s league game with Cagliari.“I’m just thinking about proving my value all the time, even if those numbers [€60m] seem a bit exaggerated,” Chiesa told Corriere dello Sport.“My only priority is to show, Sunday after Sunday, who Federico Chiesa is. Now my focus is all on Cagliari.“I’m happy here at Fiorentina. I’m only thinking of the next game.”Rick Karsdorp, Roma, Serie AKarsdorp reveals he had too much stress at Roma Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 The Dutch defender has been with the Gialorrossi since 2017, but he has not enjoyed his time in the Italian Lega Serie A.Chiesa played the full 90 minutes in both of Italy’s games over the international break against Ukraine and Poland.Despite already being a regular in the national side, the youngster still feels the need to prove himself to Italy manager Roberto Mancini.“This is a young Italy team and there’s still a long way to go. My priority is just to be ready for the national team,” he said.“I don’t feel like a key player – I just want to prove that I deserve to play for the Azzurri. I’ll work to make sure I can celebrate another call-up next time.“[Head coach Roberto] Mancini is now starting a new project. He’s always told us to play calmly and freely, without pressure.”last_img read more

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Bus driver remanded over Abrars death

first_imgA Dhaka court on Wednesday placed the driver of a ‘Suprovat Paribahan’ bus on a 7-day remand in a case filed over the death of Bangladesh University of Professionals student Abrar in a road accident at Pragati Sarani in the city, reports UNB.Dhaka metropolitan magistrate Debdas Chandra Odhikari passed the order after Aminul Islam, officer-in-charge (operation) of Gulshan police station produced driver Sirajul Islam to the court seeking a 10-day remand.Abrar Ahmed Chowdhury died after being run over by a bus of ‘Suprovat Paribahan’ in front of the main gate of Bashundhara residential area on Tuesday.After the accident, police arrested the driver.Victim’s father retired brigadier general Arif Ahmed Chowdhury filed the case at Gulshan police station on Tuesday night.last_img read more

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How Much Leisure Time Do the Happiest People Have

first_imgA research paper released late last year investigated this trade-off, attempting to pinpoint how much leisure time is best. Its authors examined the relationship between the amount of “discretionary time” people had—basically, how much time people spend awake and doing what they want—and how pleased they were with their lives. (Some examples of “discretionary” activities were watching TV, socializing, going to the movies, spending time with family, and doing nothing.) The paper, which analyzed data covering about 35,000 Americans, found that employed people’s ratings of their satisfaction with life peaked when they had in the neighborhood of two and a half hours of free time a day. For people who didn’t work, the optimal amount was four hours and 45 minutes. Read the whole story: The Atlantic Up and down the economic ladder, many Americans who work—and especially those raising kids—are pressed for time, wishing they had more of it to devote to leisure activities (or even just sleeping). At the same time, research has indicated that people who are busy tend to be happier than those who are idle, whether their busyness is purposeful or not.last_img read more

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