Christian Chamber speaker brings perspective to conflict

first_img TAGSThe Christian Chamber of Central Florida Previous articleThwarting violence in an “us vs. them” societyNext articleThe best news of the week Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Karen Pelot Speaks at May Lunch – “Three Truths About Conflict”“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called the sons of God.” Matthew 5:9. The truth is, when handled effectively, conflict provides incredible opportunities to learn, create, develop, and transform. Karen Pelot uses her real-world experience as a former corporate leader, professional mediator, and communication specialist to teach clients how to respond wisely, rather than react regretfully, in the midst of conflict. Karen will help you view the conflict from a new perspective, give you self-awareness raising tips for staying calm and clear when emotions are heated, and a quick path to successful resolution.Karen PelotKaren Pelot MBA MDR is the founder and CEO of PERSPECTIVES, LLC, specializing in reducing and resolving conflict, increasing team engagement, and instilling accountability for behaviors and results in the workplace. Prior to founding her company in 2008, Karen served as a corporate leader for more than fifteen years with three Fortune 100 companies, where she developed and led special investigation units. Her experience as a senior corporate leader, in-depth understanding of human behaviors and motivators, and ten years as a professional mediator has equipped Karen with unique insights and qualifications for assessing organizational detailers and partnering with clients to establish and implement effective solutions. It’s “the people stuff” that gets in the way of individual and organizational success.  Karen and her team at PERSPECTIVES, LLC are experts with “the people stuff”. To register for the May 10 lunch, go here. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

West Cornwall Pasty Co launches Mourinho creation

first_imgWest Cornwall Pasty Co has launched a commemorative piri-piri pasty to celebrate the return of Portuguese football coach Jose Mourinho to the Premier League. Created by BabyGRAND, the pasty company’s creative agency, the Special One pasty will be on sale on a first-come first-served basis. It will be available for the start of the football season at Stamford Bridge.Digital screens and posters around the Chelsea stadium will promote the limited-edition pasty during the club’s first Premier League match against Hull on Saturday.Shelagh Smale, marketing director for the West Cornwall Pasty Co, said: “We’d like to know what Jose Mourinho thinks of our new recipe.“It brings together the best of Britain and Portugal – a bit like the special one himself.”The pasty is one of many new products BabyGRAND will launch with the pasty company, including a Christmas range.BabyGRAND won the creative account in June this year following a five-way pitch against Torch by Design, The Collaborators, Tait and JHP.last_img read more

MASS title in hand, Wagner leads charge to Grandview

first_imgEddie Wagner wrapped up the 2017 Mid-Atlantic Sprint Series championship with his Sept. 22 IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car feature win at Bridgeport Speedway.By Erika Palmai WagnerNEWFIELD, N.J. – With the inaugural season coming to an end, Eddie Wagner of Newfield, N.J. was named the 2017 Engler Machine and Tool Mid-Atlantic IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car Series champion  af­ter winning the Sept. 22 feature at Bridgeport Speedway.This Saturday, Wagner looks to continue his streak by visiting victory lane at Grandview Speedway to claim the $500 to win payday, which was upped from the regular $300 to win by series spon­sor Freiberger Excavating.“I always wanted to win a championship title but I haven’t always had the chance to run a complete schedule. When I have focused on points, I finished second and third each time,” Wagner said. “It really hasn’t hit me yet that I’ve won because the season hasn’t ended, and we’re focusing on com­ing out on top in the last string of events.“But I am proud to have won this thing with such a small team of just me, my dad and my buddy Mark, who’s stuck with me since the beginning,” he added. “It takes a lot of dedication from not just my part, but from crew guys also, which are hard to find on a weekly basis so I’m very thank­ful for the help that I have.”The 27-year-old Wagner, who began his career racing quarter midgets at the age of 13, worked his way up to through the micro sprint ranks before purchasing his first full-sized sprint car in 2009, rac­ing with the United Racing Club before joining the Tri-State RaceSaver Sprint Series in 2012.“I learned a lot racing with URC when I first started but it just got to be too expensive,” he said. ”When the RaceSaver Sprint Car division took off in this area, it only made sense to me to start running with those guys because of how close to home we were able to run and also the cost to race a 305 was significantly cheaper than with the 360s.”Now, five years later, Wagner owns five victories all coming from Bridgeport Speedway, a 2015 Poker Series Championship from Bridgeport and now the Mid-Atlantic Sprint Series title.The Mid-Atlantic Sprint Series heads to Grandview for the final time this year, for the Thunder On The Hill Racing Series Triple Thunder Thriller, a much-anticipated event for many teams this season.This event is an open invitation race, allowing teams from all over the opportunity to race at the criti­cally acclaimed Premier Sprint Car Track in the area. More information on this event will be released later this week.last_img read more

14 days agoRed Bull Salzburg hotshot Haaland now Man Utd priority target

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Red Bull Salzburg hotshot Haaland now Man Utd priority targetby Paul Vegas14 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveRed Bull Salzburg hotshot Erling Haaland is now Manchester United’s priority target for 2020.AS says United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has made the teenager his top target ahead of next season. However United will face a battle with Madrid, who are also believed to be keen on bringing him to the Bernabeu.It is claimed that Haaland ‘fits like a glove’ as Madrid are keen on finding a long-term replacement for Karim Benzema, who turns 31 in December.The 19-year-old has scored a remarkable 18 goals in 11 appearances this season, and after a recent illness, he climbed off the bench to notch Salzburg’s equaliser in this month’s Champions League clash with Liverpool at Anfield, which the Reds ultimately went on to win 4-3. last_img read more

Ebay sues Amazon saying it tried to poach its sellers

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Ebay filed a lawsuit against Amazon Wednesday, saying the online retail giant used eBay’s messaging system to steal its sellers.In the lawsuit, eBay said Amazon representatives signed up for eBay accounts and messaged sellers to get them to sell their goods on Amazon.com, which eBay said violated its user agreement. According to the complaint, Amazon representatives spelled out their email addresses and asked eBay sellers to talk on the phone in order to evade detection.Ebay called it an “orchestrated, co-ordinated, worldwide campaign” to “illegally lure eBay sellers to sell on Amazon.”Seattle-based Amazon declined to comment on the lawsuit.Both eBay and Amazon rely on independent sellers to boost their revenue, but it’s become a big part of Amazon’s growth: Last year, for the first time, more than half the items sold on Amazon were from third-party sellers.Ebay, based in San Jose, California, said it wants Amazon to stop misusing its messaging platform and to pay it an unspecified amount.last_img read more

RCMP investigate theft of trailer loaded with UTV

first_imgUTV: Blue and black, 2018 Kawasaki TeryX4 800Trailer:2018 Lamar 83 x 14’ Tandem axle trailer with4’ standup mesh gate andspare tire with rim mounted on right side of the trailer.Suspect Vehicle:The suspect vehicle was described as an older model GMC Safari or Ford Astro min-van.The Fort St John RCMP continue to investigate and are asking anyone who has information in this matter to contact police. If you have information about this incident or can assist in identifying suspects, you are asked to contact the Fort St John RCMP at 250-787-8100. Should you wish to remain anonymous, please call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or submit a tip online at www.crimestoppersnebc.ca. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – On December 17, 2018, the Fort St. John RCMP received a report of a stolen side by side (UTV) and trailer from a business located in the area of 89th Ave/107th St, Fort St John, B.C.The theft occurred in the early morning hours on December 17, 2018.  The suspect(s) damaged the fence and entered the property with a van before hooking up to the trailer and leaving the area.Description of items stolen:last_img read more

Fire to Made In Heaven Shabana lauds change

first_imgMumbai: From 1996 when her film Fire showcased a homosexual relationship to 2019 when a web series like ‘Made In Heaven’ has tackled the LGBTQ subject with deft, veteran actor Shabana Azmi has witnessed a change worth applauding. When Deepa Mehta’s Fire had released, the film was opposed by the orthodox sections of the Indian society. In hindsight, Shabana said: “Look, that film released in 1996. Since then if I look at the journey till ‘Made In Heaven’, which is a recent example, I have to say that space has opened up, really. Also Read – Hilarie Burton, Jeffery Dean Morgan tie the knot”I always believe that films are a reflection of our society and good films can influence society. There is a relation… but there is an acceptance and that has to be applauded.” While in Fire, Shabana played a housewife named Radha who falls in love with her sister-in-law, in the American independent film Signature Move, she essayed a m other to a girl who is lesbian. The latter film is about how with time, the mother tries to be compassionate towards her child when she comes out of the closet. Shabana said: “Parental support is needed when a youngster is coming out of the closet. I would suggest a film (Evening Shadows) It is a mother-son story. “When the mother learns that her son is homosexual, she gets horrified. But later how they understand each other… that is a very beautiful narrative. Watching that film will surely lead to sensitisation.”last_img read more

Mens basketball Six years and 80hour weeks Kyle Davis became Ohio States

Ohio State video coordinator Kyle Davis spent six years with the program without salary, now he’s living his dream as video coordinator. Credit: Courtesy of Sam HollingsheadOn Feb. 27 inside the Schottenstein Center, Ohio State men’s basketball video coordinator Kyle Davis made the final preparations needed for the next day’s game at Penn State. The day’s practice was scheduled for 3 p.m., and less than three hours later, the entire staff and team would board a bus routed for the airport, then fly to State College, Pennsylvania.At 1 p.m. Davis was approached by associate head coach Dave Dickerson. He asked Davis to compile an organized database that lists every game remaining, through the state championship, for each high-school prospect OSU is recruiting.“When do you need it?” Davis asked. Dickerson answered, by the end of practice. So Davis grabbed graduate assistant Chris Logsdon, who helps with the bulk of the video responsibilities, and the two sat in the video room inside the practice gym and compiled the database for the next four hours. Logsdon found all matchups for the in-state recruits the program is looking at and Davis covered the rest of the recruits. The spreadsheet, which included nearly 70 prospective recruits, was done by 5 p.m.“That’s what you got to do, though,” Davis said.After sifting through complicated state tourney brackets, Davis spearheaded a project that enabled the coaching staff to know who they can visit on certain days and who to send messages of encouragement to on their game days.“There’s no one that can spoonfeed you this information,” Davis said. “This information is out there, but it’s in 17 different places. Every college basketball program needs someone that is capable of finding all this information, putting it together and making sense of it in a way for your whole staff to understand.”For OSU’s program, that someone is Davis, who has been with the organization for seven seasons — four as a student manager, two as a graduate assistant and one in his current role. The three video coordinators before Davis are all current assistant coaches. Kevin Kuwik is at Dayton, Greg Paulus is an assistant at OSU and Jake Diebler just finished his first season as an assistant at Vanderbilt.Davis doesn’t have the coaching experience or playing experience that those in the role before him had, so the path to becoming video coordinator was even more difficult. For six years, his only income was per diem for road trips and holiday breaks as he continued to rack up student loans from undergraduate and graduate school. He spent 30-40 hours each week for four years and 60-plus hours per week for two years at the Schott. But becoming an official member of the OSU coaching staff was always the end goal. Davis’ career has been defined by doing the jobs few would want to do.A startDavis’ passion for coaching began during his sophomore at nearby Hilliard Darby High School when he needed volunteer hours for a class he was taking. He reached out to a local recreational league to help with a sixth-grade team. Then, two weeks before the season, he suddenly became the head coach.The original coach quit and left 16-year-old Davis with a group of kids and parents he had never met.“I loved it. But my team stunk,” he said. “Ironically enough, the guy who was the coach of my team, no one really liked him. So the commissioner of the league purposefully gave him the worst kids in the league. We weren’t very good. I think we won one game all year.”The losses didn’t matter. Davis couldn’t get enough.Davis, back right, started coaching sixth graders when he was 16 years old. Credit: Courtesy of Kyle DavisSo when the commissioner asked him back as a coach, he agreed. That next season, Davis said his team of sixth graders was undefeated. However, some of the parents voiced concern regarding his coaching style after Davis ran a zone that resulted in allowing just two points.Davis said that’s when he learned he was a little too competitive for that league.But before he left, Davis made a valuable connection with OSU’s strength and conditioning coach Dave Richardson; Richardson’s son was on Davis’ team. He also met then-OSU assistant coach — now the team’s director of recruiting and player development — Alan Major, who was watching Richardson’s son play.“I’ll never forget Alan Major, I talked to him after the game and he said, ‘Well, if you’re not a player, you can come be a manager if you want to get involved with coaching,’” Davis said. “From that day forward I thought that would be a pretty cool thing to do.”But he wasn’t done coaching just yet. He still had two more years of high school.At the time, Davis’ brother was in seventh grade and 6-foot-4. Davis knew a few of his brother’s friends and knew them to be pretty good athletes for their age. So, that spring after he concluded coaching in rec league, he began to recruit some of them and other kids at his brother’s middle school and founded an AAU team — at age 17. The 13-and-under Ohio Havoc played their first games that summer.“I’m sitting there and I had like $11,000 in my hand (for team fees),” he said. “I’m just thinking like, I’m 17 years old. I have $11,000 in my hand to spend on uniforms, travel, tournament fees and all that. What am I doing with my life? This isn’t something a 17-year-old gets to do.”That summer and the next, Davis took his team to compete in tournaments throughout Ohio and in nearby states like Indiana — some of which his team won. He also coached at nationals.Through that experience, watching the competition at that level and finding a passion for coaching, Davis took Major’s advice and became a student manager at OSU when he enrolled Fall 2010.The journeyFreshmen managers are given the duties not sought after by anyone else. Carrying towels and water, mopping up puddles of sweat, dragging Gilman dummies from the main court to the upstairs court along with the cart full of other practice necessities, and staying late to rebound for players are the basic on-paper duties they have.Being a basketball manager is a fraternity with a rite of passage — one where respect isn’t easily earned. There’s not a lot of glory that goes with it either. It’s not a paid position. Managers still have to go to class, then it is right to the Schottenstein Center six days a week for at least three hours (in the preseason, it’s more like four hours). On game days, managers have to be there dressed and ready to hit the floor five hours before tip for shootaround. Managers receive stylish team-issued gear, including a pair of Lebron-brand shoes, but when adding all of it with two games per week, it gets to be roughly 30-40 hours a week outside of the classroom.“No one asked us to do this. This is just something that over the years I learned how to do it, I thought it could be a cool thing. I thought it could be more efficient and it allowed me to extend myself to do other things.” – Kyle DavisBut that didn’t matter to Davis. Being a part of the men’s basketball program at OSU was a title he held with pride. After all, Davis had higher aspirations. From the first day, Davis would do anything possible to become the video coordinator at OSU.OK, well, the second day. The first day, then-senior manager Bryce Crawford, now-assistant coach at Division I University of Maryland Baltimore County, told Davis and each freshman manager privately, “Listen, I don’t like any of you. You haven’t done spit for this program, and I’m not going to like any one of you until you can prove you can do something around here.”“I loved that he did that because it created the most amazing work ethic in us,” Davis said. “And we all thought Bryce was this biggest (jerk) in the world … but it was really cool because we were like, ‘Man, this guy’s legit.’”Davis, back right, coached the Ohio Havoc AAU team for two years before becoming a manager at OSU. Credit: Courtesy of Kyle DavisKuwik, the Dayton assistant, was the video coordinator when Davis joined the program. Davis walked into the video room inside the practice gym and asked Kuwik to help with the video responsibilites, which is work normally reserved to the senior managers and graduate assistants.In the room were four DVRs the staff used to record every game of any team that OSU would play against that year. Kuwik told Davis his tasks involved recording all of those games, which required him to know the TV schedules of those games, find the channels and tape them. Then, he would transfer it to a DVD, catalog it and store it.Kuwik left for Dayton after Davis’ freshman year — when OSU lost to Kentucky as the No. 1 overall seed in the Sweet Sixteen of the NCAA Tournament — and Paulus entered the role. That same year, OSU hired Chris Jent, a former NBA assistant, for a similar role. Davis continued to work around the video department with Paulus at the helm. After that first season, Jent requested to change from the DVSport video software to Sportcode, which he used in the NBA.With the addition of Sportcode, Davis and the entire video team were able to finish video work in half the time. It’s as if they traded in a 1989 Honda Civic for a NASA space shuttle, Davis said.Through his four years as a manager, Davis became the low-level busybody member in the organization that the staff would turn to when things needed to be done. As senior manager, he spent more time in the film room and was in charge of a staff of a dozen or so managers. He was the main point of contact between the staff’s needs and making sure there were managers at the gym for rebounding, opposing team shootarounds and any other task — often with less than two hours notice. Davis helped coordinate official visits, assisted in setting up the team tailgate before football games. He even helped change a tire on State Route 315 on the vehicle of former OSU guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. to ensure he would be on time for practice. Davis made it his job to do any menial task possible to be recognized as a reliable member of the program.“He was always around. He was very adamant about getting involved and tried to figure things out,” Crawford said of Davis. “He was just very locked in and it was very clear that he wanted to get into the business.”Following Davis’ final season in 2014 as a manager, he and then-graduate assistant Weston Strayer made it a mission of theirs to memorize the Sportscode manual from cover to cover.Now, after two years, Davis said he and Strayer designed 16-20 different programs on the Sportscode software to use and relay information to the coaches.“No one asked us to do this,” he said. “This is just something that over the years I learned how to do it, I thought it could be a cool thing. I thought it could be more efficient and it allowed me to extend myself to do other things.”Davis continued to work on these programs through Diebler’s final two years with OSU, which made the video department even more valuable.“It’s so hard to do your job to the best of your abilities as video coordinator if you’re doing it by yourself,” Diebler said. “You need great, great help and those guys were the best in the country, in my opinion at what they did.”Outside of games is when Davis does most of his work, finding new trends that can help coaches make educated decisions for on-court personnel. During road trips, Davis had to have the entire game with individual stats coded by the time the plane landed, which led to Davis frequently being told by flight attendants to turn his laptop off. In game, Davis designed programs that can give OSU its best small and big lineup in the middle of a game. He also charted each shot a player takes on particular plays and paired it with live video that is being coded in the team locker room, and has that ready for coaches to view at halftime and end of the game.“The money didn’t matter, the title didn’t matter, but to know that I had a future within our staff just meant the world to me. I told everyone from the beginning, I’m here for Ohio State basketball. Whether that means I’m wiping the floor, cutting video or recruiting, just whatever it is, I’m happy to be here.” – Kyle DavisHe said sometimes information on paper can be misleading and cannot accurately tell the staff why the team was shooting poorly from a particular spot on the floor. Therefore, he linked all of the stats to video for evidence that can help with development.“I’m not really an analytics guy. I’m more of an analytics ‘make you look at things in a different way’ sort of guy,” he said. “Numbers are great but until you can actually see why those numbers came to be about, it really doesn’t help you as a coach. You can’t coach numbers. You have to coach basketball things. That’s what this allows you to do.”In the 2015-16 season, Davis was the chief graduate assistant receiving some much needed help in the video room from walk-on-turned-graduate assistant Andrew Goldstein, team videographer David Aaron, head manager Robbie Rucki and others. Diebler, still the video coordinator at the time, was often in the video room compiling anything the staff needed at the last minute, but also knew Davis was available at a moment’s notice and had the assurance that Davis and Goldstein were getting the work completed well ahead of time. With that belief in Davis, Diebler was able to spend more time on the court with the staff and players, and Davis was able to do much of the video coordinator role before he was promoted.Davis, who estimated he worked 75-88 hours per week in his last year as a graduate assistant, said Diebler was the greatest thing to have happened to his development in the way he empowered the video staff.“He’s got a great feel for what’s necessary in that area of preparation and things like that,” Diebler said of Davis. “I thought it was very valuable to help me do my job and (he) worked really hard, spent long hours, wasn’t afraid to stay up late or get up early.”On top of the strides he made in the video room, Davis took on some, if not all, of the responsibilities dealt to the role of recruiting and operations coordinator, which was vacant during the 2015-16 season after Christopher Spartz left the program.“When he left — not like I was going for his job or anything, but it was around this time last year … and I was like, well, someone has to do some of the stuff he was doing,” Davis said. “And I wasn’t sure what we were doing or who we were going to hire so I just started sitting at his desk and doing his job, and nobody said otherwise.”Davis began handling logistics for official visits, helping coordinate prospects with faculty advisors, coaching staff and touring the campus. He also prepared recruiting packets and any other task the program needed done.He wasn’t instructed to do more work than he was given as a graduate assistant, but as was the case as a manager, Davis never shied away from the opportunities available, which were mostly the undesirable tasks that someone had to perform.Through all of that effort came an unexpected moment.On Feb. 28, 2016, OSU hosted No. 8 Iowa as a last-chance effort to back itself into the NCAA Tournament. Dickerson walked over to Davis during the under-eight media timeout while the team was down five and asked for the team’s best small lineup throughout the season. Davis had the info and gave it to him. The lineup, which Davis can’t explicitly remember, went into the game halfway through the second half and cut into the Hawkeyes lead. The Buckeyes earned their second top-10 victory that season, 68-64 over Iowa.It was trial by fire for the work Davis had put in for the past year and a half.“That was so frickin’ scary because if something went bad, (Dickerson) was never going to trust me again,” he said. “It was the stress test. This wasn’t the last minute or last possession, this was towards the end of the game but it was one of those things where it was really cool for me to see that I put all these hours into something, not knowing if it was ever going to be used or not, and it got used.”That hard work, however, nearly didn’t earn him a job on the staff. Davis had a decision to make about his future with the program.A decisionAs mentioned before, managers and graduate assistants aren’t paid and there isn’t time for a second job if you want to advance to be a coach. On top of that, the basketball program does not pay for tuition of graduate school. For Davis’ second year as a graduate assistant, he didn’t have the funds to pay for housing around campus, so he was forced to move back in with his parents in Hilliard. Sometimes, he would even sleep at the Schott if he was there late and needed to be there early the next morning.“It got to the point where I realized I’m 24 years old. I have a lot of student debt. I’m living at home with my parents. I’m chasing this coaching dream, and I love it,” Davis said. “But ultimately, the programs I have built on a platform called Sports Tech … they were rapidly expanding.”Patrick Ford, a former manager and Davis’ friend, worked at Sports Tech’s headquarters in Lincoln, Nebraska, and set Davis up with an interview. Sports Tech, the company that bought the popular football video service Hudl, was looking for people who already knew the software; Davis fit the bill.A year before, Davis saw Strayer struggle to get into coaching before Strayer took a job at Lake Superior State in Michigan, which left doubt in Davis’ mind about his chances. Coaching was Davis’ dream but maybe it wasn’t meant to be. After all, he had to start making money.Davis said he once sat down and calculated how much money he would have made if he were paid minimum wage for every hour he worked through his six years with the program. The number after taxes: $111,973.23.“It made me want to f—ing puke,” he said.In the middle of the 2015-16 season, all Davis had to do in order to accept the Sports Tech job was make a trip to Nebraska. However, by mid-April, Diebler left the program for Vanderbilt, which resulted in Davis taking on his responsibilities.Davis was about to make a call to Sports Tech to schedule his visit when David Egelhoff, the director of basketball operations, tapped Davis on his shoulder and asked to meet with him in his office. Davis asked to make the phone call first, but Egelhoff told him that’s why he needed to talk to him.Egelhoff offered Davis his first paid position on staff as the recruiting coordinator. He started to run through the details of the offer and the job, but Davis accepted before Egelhoff could finish.“That’s what I had always wanted,” Davis said. “The moment that presented itself, I was all in. Everyone on the staff knows I’m a two-feet-in guy. I’ve given everything I’ve had to this program for six years. It hasn’t always been the work on the front page. It’s been the work behind closed doors, and I’m cool with that.”“The money didn’t matter, the title didn’t matter, but to know that I had a future within our staff just meant the world to me. I told everyone from the beginning, I’m here for Ohio State basketball. Whether that means I’m wiping the floor, cutting video or recruiting, just whatever it is, I’m happy to be here.”Less than three months later, OSU hired Alan Major — the one who first planted the idea of being a coach at OSU into Davis’ mind — as coordinator of recruiting and player development, and Davis was promoted to video coordinator.One of the first things Davis did as video coordinator was call his mentor, Diebler. Davis told Diebler that when he took the job at Vanderbilt, that was one of the best things that could have happened to Davis. Davis said he was able to prove his worth to the staff with Diebler’s absence, which contributed to his promotion.Davis was in charge of the entire official visit of now-junior point guard C.J. Jackson, who will likely be the starting point guard in the 2017-18 season.“I think he’s got a bright future in coaching because he works hard, he cares about the guys on the team and wants to see them succeed,” Diebler said. “I think he’s going to be a good coach and I’m excited to have worked with him for three years and excited to see what the future holds for him.”Davis sits beside the coaching staff and players during the Indiana game on March 4 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Courtesy of Sam HollingsheadThe job he wants to doSince taking over as video coordinator, Davis has taken on projects that he saw needing improvement and has applied lessons from Diebler on staff management.Davis began to reshape the team’s social media presence this season with the help of David Aaron, the team’s videographer, and Joe Gemma, who works as a graphic designer for the men’s and women’s basketball programs.Davis has also become more involved in official visits. He coordinates how the recruit is getting to Columbus, how is he going to be picked up, when is he arriving for practice, when will he meet with the Student Athlete Support Service Office (SASSO) and what the presentation will entail.“All the little things from golf carts to making sure you can get a private room at a dinner. All those little things, that’s my life,” he said. “The coaches are going to deal with the nitty gritty stuff, but I’m trying to provide the examples with my academic career and my career around the program, how they can relate to kids too.”He also has taken on some operations functions to allow Egelhoff to focus on big picture items for the program.And video — he still does plenty of that.Davis no longer counts the hours he works at home because he understands it’s the nature of the job.“What makes the video coordinator job so tough is that when you go home — you may take a breather to make some dinner — there’s more film to watch,” Diebler said. “That’s like the video coordinator’s nightmare is that you didn’t do enough preparation going into a game to where there’s a surprise. Only way to do that is to make sure you watch all the available film.”Davis had been doing that well before he was named the team’s video coordinator.The only difference now is Davis is performing in the role he has always wanted to.“I love Kyle just from the standpoint of where he started and he’s worked his way up,” OSU coach Thad Matta said. “He’s one of those guys that the technology portion of his position is so important. What he can do in terms of how quick he can get the edits done and he’s spot on with everything. He’s figured me out in terms of what I like and what I don’t like. “He’s a guy that when we lose, he’s as sad as anybody in our program, and when we win, he’s as happy (as anyone). He’s a Buckeye.”So, was the journey worth it?“Absolutely. There’s no question,” Davis said. “If you would’ve asked me six years ago, what’s the realistic dream, I would have told you: to be the video coordinator of Ohio State basketball.” read more

Mens Soccer Ohio States season comes to an end with 31 loss

Ohio State junior defender Osman Fofanah dribbles past Rutgers defenders during the second half of the Ohio State-Rutgers game on Sep. 30. Ohio State lost 3-2. Credit: Cody Mefferd | For the LanternThe Ohio State men’s soccer team (1-15-2, 0-8-1 Big Ten) saw one of the toughest seasons in program history come to an end on Saturday afternoon at the hands of Northwestern (6-8-5, 1-5-3 Big Ten) in the No. 8-No. 9 seed matchup in the opening round of the Big Ten tournament. The Buckeyes went ahead early in the 17th minute on a goal from redshirt junior forward Jake Scheper, his second goal of the season.Scheper took a pass from junior defender Osman Fofanah and volleyed a lob shot past Northwestern’s sophomore goalkeeper Miha Miskovic. It was all Northwestern from there on out. The Wildcats found three goals from their midfield to seal the victory. Junior midfielder Sean Lynch, senior midfielder Camden Buescher and junior midfielder Matt Moderwell tallied the goals for Northwestern.Buescher and Moderwell are the two leading scorers for the Wildcats, and they provided the punch that is expected from them, as they iced the game with goals in the 78th minute and 88th minute respectively. Ohio State took the early lead not only on the scoreboard, but on the stat sheet. The Buckeyes outshot Northwestern 7-4 in the opening 45 minutes. Five minutes after the Scheper goal, Northwestern found the equalizer when Lynch scored his first goal of the season to tie it at 1-1. Despite the match being tied at the half, the opening 45 minutes seemed to put the Buckeyes in a good position to win just their second match of the season, allowing them to live and fight another day. Saturday’s match turned out to be a tale of two halves. Northwestern found its footing and pulled away from the Buckeyes, outscoring Ohio State 2-0 in the second half and outshooting the Buckeyes 7-5. Miskovic and Ohio State redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried both made three saves on the afternoon. Northwestern will advance to play No. 1 seed Indiana in the Big Ten quarterfinals. read more

Baseball Ohio State rallies from down 61 wins 108 to move to

Ohio State senior Nate Romans (7) swings at home plate in the Buckeyes’ home opener against the Lipscomb Bison on March 15, 2019 at Bill Davis Stadium. Credit: Sal Marandino | For The LanternThe Ohio State baseball team overcame an early 6-1 deficit to claim its second-straight victory. Ohio State (10-10) rallied to beat Northern Kentucky (4-13) 10-8. The Buckeyes produced 14 hits, including two home runs, in the win. After trailing 6-1 heading into the bottom of the fourth inning, Ohio State cut into the deficit to just a run by the bottom of the seventh inning. With one man on, redshirt sophomore catcher Brent Todys lifted a home run over the left field wall to give the Buckeyes their first lead of the game. “[The mindset was] just competing. I’d been struggling of late. Just going out there and putting that bat to help the team string together something,” Todys said. Five Buckeyes recorded multi-hit games, including a three-hit, two-RBI game from senior left fielder Brady Cherry. The freshmen especially shined, combining to hit .417 with five RBI. After a pair of hard groundouts started the game for Northern Kentucky, redshirt senior designated hitter Will Haueter hit a two-out double down the third base line to give his team a runner in scoring position. The Norse capitalized with a two-run home run by sophomore first baseman Griffin Doersching.Following a quick two outs in the Buckeyes’ half of the inning, Cherry snuck a ball down the third base line. Junior first baseman Conner Pohl drove home Cherry with a single to right-center field, cutting the deficit to 2-1 after one inning. Following a hit batsman and a wild pitch, a single to center put runners on the corners with one out in the top of the third inning. A strikeout got the second out, but a fielding and a throwing error by Ohio State freshman third baseman Zach Dezenzo allowed the Northern Kentucky runner from third to score. On the same play, junior right fielder Dominic Canzone roped a throw from right field to record the final out at the plate and keep the score at 3-1. Ohio State head coach Greg Beals noted the importance of the play to bail them out of the inning and prevent further damage. “That’s what you expect out of your big-time players though. Dom’s a big-time player for us. We needed him to make big plays,” Beals said.  Junior pitcher Jake Vance recorded two strikeouts in the fourth inning, but two doubles put another run on the board for the Norse. A two-run home run from redshirt freshman left fielder Sam Hedges put Northern Kentucky ahead 6-1. Vance exited the game after four innings. He allowed five earned runs with four strikeouts. But Todys said the team kept its head up even with the five-run deficit.“We felt like we were still in it, and we felt like our bats are good enough right now to where we can get ourselves back into the game when we are down like that,” Todys said. Ohio State freshman designated hitter Marcus Ernst was able to immediately respond with a leadoff single in the bottom of the fourth. Freshman center fielder Nolan Clegg launched the first home run of his collegiate career to reduce the Norse lead to three.“Just chip away at their lead,” Clegg said. “We were still very early in the game, so we had plenty of time.” A fielding error and a hit batsman kept the inning alive for the Buckeyes with two outs. Cherry took advantage with a two-RBI double to deep left-center field to make the score 6-5. “That four runs in the fourth for us kind of put us back in the mix and gave us that believing feeling,” Beals said. Northern Kentucky started the sixth inning with a pair of walks, and a bunt by Northern Kentucky advanced the runners into scoring position with one out before a sacrifice fly by Hedges moved the score to 7-5. Ohio State freshman pitcher Bayden Root stepped on the mound in the seventh inning and he struck out three, surrendering one hit. Pohl was able to hit a double in the gap in right centerfield to open the bottom of the seventh. Dezenzo drove a hard liner to third base, which bounced off the diving third baseman’s glove for a double, bringing home Pohl to cut the Ohio State deficit to one. This set the stage for Todys to lift the Buckeyes ahead with his two-run home run. Following a strikeout to record the second out of the bottom of the eighth inning, a pair of bases-loaded walks pushed the Ohio State lead to 10-7. The ninth inning proved difficult for the Buckeyes for the second-straight game. Northern Kentucky loaded the bases with two outs, and a passed-ball strikeout reduced the deficit to two. Junior pitcher Andrew Magno struck out the final batter to earn his second save of the year, as the Buckeyes survived another late-game scare.“Those experiences, I think, are thickening our skin a little bit, toughening us up. Our guys again survived,” Beals said. Root earned his first collegiate win with a four-strikeout performance in 2 2/3 innings of relief. “This was a big game, because this gets us back to even ground. Now we just go in and never look back,” Todys said. Ohio State will return to start a four-game series with Hawaii at Bill Davis Stadium at 5:05 p.m. Thursday. read more