The Wanee Music Festival Initial Lineup Has Been Revealed And It Is Glorious

first_imgThe lineup for the 2017 Wanee Music Festival is in! Taking place from April 20-22 at the Spirit of Suwannee Music Park, the festival has packed their lineup with a ton of jam scene favorites, including headliners Bob Weir, Widespread Panic and the Trey Anastasio Band.The performing artist lineup appeared on the Wanee website today, and features over a dozen exciting entries. Gov’t Mule, Dark Star Orchestra, JJ Grey & Mofro, Les Brers (ft. Butch Trucks & Jaimoe), Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band, Leftover Salmon (performing the music of Neil Young), The Greyboy Allstars, Blackberry Smoke, Matisyahu, Keller Williams’ Grateful Grass, Papadosio, Turkuaz, Pink Talking Fu – Music of David Bowie & Prince, DJ Logic, Kung Fu, Pink Talking Fish, Bobby Lee Rodgers Trio, The Marcus King Band, The Yeti Trio and Brothers and Sister Band are all featured on the 2017 lineup.You can head to the Wanee website for tickets and more information about their exciting festival!Update: It appears that the artist lineup posted on the Wanee website was actually an accidental leak, and has since been removed.last_img read more

Credit union soup for the soul

first_imgI was in Connecticut last week to join friends at Members Credit Union and Nutmeg State Financial Credit Union in celebrating their recent National Juntos Avanzamos (Together We Advance) Award (more on that in a minute). I couldn’t help but smile when I noticed via a lobby directory that Members Credit Union shares a building with the famous Chicken Soup for the Soul authors. I immediately thought about how credit union work could be considered food for the soul.For those who don’t know, Chicken Soup for the Soul is a publishing company predominately known for its Chicken Soup for the Soul series of books. The first book, like most subsequent titles in the series, consists of inspirational true stories about ordinary people’s lives. The book became a major bestseller in 1993, and remains something of a social phenomenon.Credit unions ruleWhen it comes to finding inspirational true stories about companies committed to helping the financial lives of ordinary people, credit unions rule! I hear inspirational stories of how credit unions find ways to serve people who are struggling, overlooked, and under-appreciated almost every single day.Trust me when I say that the happiest people in all of credit union land are those who are engaged in helping people – especially people who really need their help. It’s this service and outreach that, like chicken soup, nourishes the soul. It inspires the busiest of people to double down and do more, and inspires those around them to jump in, roll up their sleeves, and get to work. I believe that pursuing purpose is more rewarding than pursuing profit, and I know that I’m not alone.Consider the world we live in today, and how credit unions are clearly different and better:At a time when Wells Fargo hoped the $142-million settlement of a class-action lawsuit over its agents creating up to 2.1 million unwanted checking, savings, and credit-card accounts between 2011 and 2015 would end the iconic company’s headaches, a new report emerged of a similar scandal involving auto loans and insurance. At the time, I was engaged in conversations with the first-year class at the CUNA Management School specifically focused on credit-union best practices for serving underserved markets’ financial needs that remain unmet by most banks and targeted by tens of thousands of predatory lenders. These credit union leaders identified creative and impactful ways to respond to the underserved case studies I presented. I left that group inspired by their credit union spirit!At a time when income inequality is growing rapidly and wages have been stagnating, creating qualify-of-life challenges for millions of people in the United States and billions of people abroad, credit unions have significantly increased their efforts to reach out to and serve the underserved and overlooked. In the United States, the number of Low Income Designated credit unions has exceeded 2,300. These special credit unions are committed to serving low-income consumers and their families. In my 30-year career, I don’t believe awareness of and commitment to lower-income consumers has ever been higher. Thanks to the NCUA, National Federation of Community Development Credit Unions, CUNA, National Credit Union Foundation, CDFI Fund, Leagues, and other trade associations, awareness and advocacy have never been higher. Today, more credit unions are engaging each other and their communities to identify educational and product opportunities to help lower-income consumers make better decisions, build financial assets and better credit – all focused on creating a better quality of life for the person, family, and community. When it comes to people helping lower-income people financially, credit unions stand alone. I just completed a full-day Community Development Workshop sponsored by the Wisconsin Credit Union League and the Wisconsin Credit Union Foundation. It was cool: the workshop was at full capacity, with credit union leaders driving across the state to be part of the event. The audience included small, large, urban, and rural credit unions, each eager to find new ways to seek out and serve lower-income and underserved markets. The stories I heard from credit unions in attendance were certainly “soup for the soul.”At time when talking heads are arguing for a 700-mile-long, 30-foot wall to keep people away (from a better quality of life for themselves and their families), credit unions across the country are actively engaged in building bridges to warmly welcome Latino immigrants with affordable financial services, regardless of citizenship status. These credit unions are making meaningful investments in providing this group of overlooked consumers with access to low-cost accounts, credit-building, and affordable access to transportation, housing, and even small businesses. Today, more than 70 credit unions have received the national Juntos Avanzamos designation, recognized for having the purpose, people, and products needed to successfully serve this market. How can one adequately measure the quality-of-life impact that accompanies citizenship and financial inclusion? It’s high, and very desirable.Why it mattersI don’t know about you, but I desire chicken soup most when I’m a little under the weather. Like the chicken soup analogy, credit unions work best when they serve those who need them the most. It’s in our DNA, and for more than 100 years, credit unions have been helping those who need us the most: the overlooked and underserved.At a time when the world seems to be heading down a path of greed, fraud, and deeper inequalities between the haves and the have-nots, credit unions can gain strides by seeking out and serving those who need us the most. When credit unions do this, they are relevant, and serving as the “soup” for struggling souls. 120SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Scott Butterfield Scott is the Principal of Your Credit Union Partner, PLLC.Your Credit Union Partner (YCUP) is a trusted advisor to the leaders of more than 100 credit unions located throughout … Web: www.yourcupartner.org Detailslast_img read more

Onions being traced to salmonella

first_imgThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration is tracking a multistate outbreak of salmonella poisoning that has sickened almost 400 people in 31 states has been traced back to red onions. The onions include red, yellow, white, and sweet onions under the brand names Thomson  Premium, TLC Thomson International, Tender Loving Care, El Competitor, Hartley’s Best, Onions 52, Majestic, Imperial Fresh, Kroger, Utah Onions, and Food Lion.Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve red, white, yellow, or sweet onions from Thomson International, Inc. or products containing such onions. If you cannot tell if your onion is from Thomson International Inc., or your food product contains such onions, you should not eat, sell, or serve it, and should throw it out.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections that may be linked to these onions, so Thomson International is recalling the onions out of an abundance of caution. There have been two cases in Indiana and 7 in Ohio.  Signs of salmonella infection include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps between six hours and six days after exposure to the bacteria, the CDC said. People are usually sick for between four and seven days. Those under age 5, those over 65 and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to experience severe illness.last_img read more

Ademola Lookman: Shatters Nigeria’s Transfer Record

first_imgThe 21-year-old already played for RB Leipzig in the second half of the 2017-18 season and was directly involved in nine goals-five goals and four assists from 11 appearances in the German top-flight under the stewardship of now-Southampton manager Ralph Hasenhuttl.Since then, RB Leipzig have held an interest in Lookman. And after an underwhelming campaign where Marco Silva used him sparingly,  he is now set for a permanent exit.He saw his first-team opportunities limited upon his return to Everton last season, making only three Premier League starts and played 18 games off the bench.If Lookman’s transfer to RB Leipzig goes through, he is expected to feature in the group stage of the UEFA Champions League for the first time in his career in the new season.Things have not worked out as well as he might have hoped since making the January 2017 move from Charlton Athletic to Everton. Lookman has only managed 48 outings – with four goals and two assists – and has mainly been a bench player.But the England U-21 international is set to continue his career in Germany. He thrived in the Bundesliga previously and will hope to follow the likes of Jadon Sancho and Reiss Nelson, who both enjoyed success in the German top-flight.Analysts are of the opinion that Everton may live to rue Lookman’s exit, blaming Silva for not giving him enough opportunities in the first-team, saying that if he had been allowed to fulfill his potential, the Toffees could save millions in the transfer market as they would not need a new winger.But this was perhaps a blind spot by Silva. Instead of playing Lookman regularly, he preferred other options, such as Theo Walcott. This is why a permanent exit makes sense at this stage of the 21-year-old’s career.In 2017, Pep Guardiola was dented with his biggest loss in his coaching career by Everton, a victory that was orchestrated by the Nigerian-born England U-21 and his performance enjoyed a lot of media attention.Lookman came on in stoppage time of Everton’s 4-0 win over Manchester City to score the fourth goal after capitalising on a mistake from John Stones despite being on the pitch for just a matter of minutes.The £7.5m signing from Charlton was delighted with his performance and he said afterward: “The gaffer just said ‘play behind Rom. I was lucky to anticipate the ball and put it in the back of the net. My first premier league goal, this is my chance to score it – and I took it well.”With his goal-scoring debut for Everton, the then19-year-old Lookman dreamt playing beyond the Toffees. “One day I want to win trophies. Of course, I want to play at the highest level – whether in England or Spain, I want to be at the top. You have teams like Barcelona and Real Madrid. As a kid, I dreamed of playing for one of those teams,” he said.When Everton poached Leicester’s head of recruitment Steve Walsh in the summer, it was easy to understand the logic. The 52-year-old’s reputation had hit new heights after he unearthed Jamie Vardy, Riyad Mahrez and N’Golo Kante to inspire Leicester’s title triumph, and Everton were eager to apply the same expertise at Goodison Park.The Walsh was quick to identify the talent in Lookman as the Nigerian arrived from Charlton as a little-known teenager with no Premier League experience. But at £10m, he was the most expensive ever signing from League One.The fee reflects just how highly he is regarded by Everton. A rapid rise into Charlton’s first-team convinced Walsh that the speedy, skillful little forward could be the next breakout star from the lower leagues, and Ronald Koeman has already described him as an important part of his long-term vision for the club.Like many of Walsh’s best signings, Lookman has had an unconventional route to the top. The jump from League One to Premier League has drawn parallels with Dele Alli’s move to Tottenham, but while Alli was on MK Dons’ books from the age of 11, Lookman did not set foot in a professional academy until he was 16.Charlton U-21 coach and former Wimbledon striker, Jason Euell remembered how Lookman came to the club’s attention. “It was right at the end of the U-16 year in 2014,” he tells Sky Sports. “The majority of scholarship decisions had already been made, but every year our U-16s play a game against Inner London, an FA side for the best players in South London.”Charlton had received a tip-off about Lookman. The youngster was playing what Euell describes as “innocent Sunday football” for an amateur team called Waterloo FC in the London borough of Lambeth, but he produced a dazzling performance for the county side in front of Charlton’s watching coaching staff.“He had no academy background at all,” says Euell. “Sometimes it can happen that a player slips through the net, but we were lucky to already have a relationship with the county and with Waterloo FC. We signed him on a scholarship straight away.”Lookman was drafted into Charlton’s U-18 side during his first season at the club, scoring 17 goals in 29 appearances as they clinched both regional and national titles. It wasn’t long before Premier League clubs started to take note, but Charlton are experts in youth coaching and understood the need to be cautious with his development.“We knew the talent he had but sometimes it’s about taking your time with someone like him,” says Euell. “He had been training once or twice a week but he had to get used to every day, professional football while doing his school work. He had growing to do and he had to start a full-time weight programme , so we had to be careful with how we used him.”Lookman was eventually promoted to Euell’s U-21s, and in November 2015 he made his senior debut in a 1-0 defeat to MK Dons. Charlton’s season would end in relegation to League One, but a little over a year on from playing Sunday league football, Lookman took the step up in his stride, scoring five goals in 24 appearances and landing the 2015/16 Championship Apprentice of the Year award.Lookman’s breakthrough was recognised with his first England U-19 call-up last May. His outstanding attributes are his pace, dribbling and powerful finishing ability with both feet, but without any professional coaching, before he joined Charlton, there were areas of his game which required extra attention. “There were a lot of things he missed out on, and that was the learning and understanding of the game,” says Euell. “Young lads always say they can play football, but then comes the tactical side of it, the game understanding and the decision-making process.“We didn’t want to stop Ademola from doing what he does because that’s what makes him special, it was just about getting him to understand when and where to do certain things. At every level, every game is different. He had to learn what was needed from him in and out of possession.”Charlton rejected an offer from Crystal Palace in the summer, but Lookman never lost focus and added seven goals in 25 appearances for Charlton in the first half of this season. Euell chuckles as he recalls having to drag him off the training pitch at Charlton’s Sparrow’s Lane headquarters. That determination to improve should serve him well at Everton.“He’s a great character and everyone else at the training ground would say exactly the same thing,” says Euell. “He is just a humble boy who loves his football. He hates being injured and he always wants to do extra work. He just wants the ball at his feet and wants to improve. He’s one of those guys who absolutely hate losing.”Charlton manager Karl Robinson only coached Lookman for a few weeks having taken over at The Valley in November, but he described the teenager as an “incredible talent” and a “joy to work with” when the deal was confirmed. Lookman has made a positive impression on just about everyone who has known him, and he heads to Everton hoping for more of the same.“He called me up to say goodbye,” says Euell. “I said: ‘Goodbye? It’s only a see you later; you’re only going up north!’ We had a nice chat. I gave him a bit of advice and wished him well.” Lookman is still learning, but he has the talent and he has the temperament too. In his new Merseyside surroundings, he might just become Walsh’s latest success story.Born as Ademola Olajade Lookman on October 20, 1997, in Wandsworth, London to Nigerian parents, he attended St. Thomas the Apostle College in Peckham where he achieved three As and five As at GCSE.Lookman signed for Everton on January 5, 2017, for a fee of £7.5m rising to £11m on a four-and-a-half-year contract and made his debut for the club 10 days later. He scored on his debut.He received his first international call up on May 16, 2016, being named in the England U-19 squad for a doubleheader against Mexico. He was subsequently named in the England squad for the European U-19 Championships the same summer.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram In the summer of 2016, Ahmed Musa set a new transfer record when he moved from Leicester City to CSKA Moscow in a deal worth £16.6 million. That record is set to be shattered by Everton prodigy, Ademola Lookman, as he set to dump the Toffees for RB Leipzig in a move worth up to £22.5mGerman Bundesliga club, RB Leipzig are set to break Nigerian transfer record for a winger as Everton agree to sell Ademola Lookman for a fee said to be worth up to £22.5m.Before now, the costliest transfer involving a Nigerian winger is Ahmed Musa’s switch to Leicester City in the summer of 2016, with CSKA Moscow pocketing £16.6 million from the deal, meaning Lookman’s return to RB Leipzig is set to surpass that fee.last_img read more